ANFS Students Flock to Graduate and Professional Programs

June 6, 2012 under CANR News

Pictured, from left to right: Christa Kurman, Noelle Diana, Allison Gedney, Samantha Pettingill, Allie Keresman, Alexandra Aaron, Marissa Dick, Meghan Fitzpatrick, Jennifer West, Holly Powers, and Brooke Fenamore.

A large number of new and recent graduates from the University of Delaware’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Department of Animal and Food Sciences (ANFS) have been accepted into positions in professional and graduate programs and will be entering the programs this year.

Beyond the success of individual graduates, the department is also exceedingly proud of the broad impact ANFS graduates will continue to have on the field of veterinary medicine. The University of Delaware will soon be represented by 22 additional ANFS graduates entering 9 different veterinary schools. These veterinary students will later join the ranks of more than 150 UD ANFS alumni who are already working as veterinarians worldwide.

The ANFS department would like to recognize the following 2012 ANFS graduates and recent alumni for their significant achievements and wish them all the best in their educational programs and careers:

The students include-

Professional Programs:
Alex Aaron
Turquoise Abdullah
Brittany Branick
Lisa Brody (’10)
Simone (Issey) Chew-Chin (’11)
Noelle Diana
Marissa Dick
Kristen Endres
Brooke Fenamore
Meghan Fitzpatrick
Allison Gedney
Marissa Goldstein
Caitlin Gormley
Rebecca Gounaris
Allie Keresman
Caroline Kozar
Grace Oldfield
Holly Powers
Alex Pinamonti (’04)
Stephanie Principati
Rothman Reyes
Samantha Rivera
Jennifer West
Ross University (Vet Med)
University of Delaware (Accelerated Nursing Program)
Ross University (Vet Med)
University of Pennsylvania (Vet Med)
University of Pennsylvania (Vet Med)
Ohio State University (Vet Med)
University of Pennsylvania (Vet Med)
University of Pennsylvania (Vet Med)
University of Pennsylvania (Vet Med)
Tufts University (Vet Med)
Ross University (Vet Med)
Ross University (Vet Med)
University of Pennsylvania (Vet Med)
Virginia-Maryland Regional College (Vet Med)
Purdue University (Vet Med)
St. George’s University (Vet Med)
North Carolina State University (Vet Med)
University of Pennsylvania (Vet Med)
University of Pennsylvania (Vet Med)
University of Pennsylvania (Vet Med)
Michigan State University (Vet Med)
Ross University (Vet Med)
University of Pennsylvania (Vet Med)
Graduate Programs:
Christa Kurman
Jasmine Macies
Allison Rogers
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Masters in Animal Science-Dairy Cattle Behavior)
Columbia University (Masters in Public Health)
University of Delaware (Masters in Animal Science-Avian Science)
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New Poultry Extension Blog

January 26, 2012 under CANR News, Cooperative Extension

The UD Poultry Extension blog has officially launched at http://sites.udel.edu/poultryextension!

The blog is maintained by Bill Brown, state poultry extension specialist, and Stephen Collier, poultry research manager, both at Carvel Research and Education Center in Georgetown.

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Jack Gelb awarded 2012 Worrilow Award

January 23, 2012 under CANR News, Cooperative Extension, Events

Worrilow Award winners (from left to right) Ted Haas(2001), Wesley Towers (1990), Jack Gelb (2012), U.S. Sen. Tom Carper, Walter Hopkins (1997), Joanne Whalen (2011), Buzz Klopp (2000) and Ed Kee (1995). Present but not pictured was Keith Carlisle (1998).

U.S. Sen. Tom Carper spoke to a large gathering at University of Delaware Cooperative Extension’s Friends of Ag Breakfast in Harrington on Friday, Jan. 20, concluding a successful Delaware Ag Week. The breakfast also served as the occasion to present the 2012 George M. Worrilow Award to UD’s Jack Gelb, Jr.

Gelb is chair of UD’s Department of Animal and Food Sciences and director of the Avian Bioscience Center in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR).

The award is presented annually by the UD Agricultural Alumni Association to an individual, in recognition of exemplary service to agriculture. The honor is named for Dr. George M. Worrilow, who served as dean of the college from 1954 to 1965.

Past Worrilow Award honorees Ted Haas (2001) and Spangler (Buzz) Klopp (2000) saluted Gelb’s five decades of excellence and his significant contributions to CANR, Delaware agriculture and, in particular, to the Delmarva poultry Industry.

“Jack is known to Delaware, nationally and internationally for his research and emphasis in avian respiratory diseases, avian influenza, and for his major role in the discovery of Gumboro Disease,” Klopp said.

The economic benefits of his research have been significant, saving the Delaware poultry economy $250,000 a week, Klopp told the large audience.

“This is an incredible honor for me,” Gelb said. “I did not have the opportunity to meet this fine gentleman (George Worrilow) but I have heard so many stories how he set things up and got things done. He inspired people about agriculture. That’s what it is all about, isn’t it?”

At UD, Gelb earned a bachelor’s degree in entomology in 1974 and a master’s degree in animal virology in 1976. He received his doctorate in microbiology and avian medicine from the University of Georgia.

“I came to the college in the 1970s, riding that first ecology wave and then, as now, students were welcomed, nurtured and developed there,” Gelb said.

He recalled, “As students, we got to work with leading veterinarians and researchers and work with farmers directly.”

Gelb marveled at the value of being able to put what was learned in the classroom and lab to practical use in the field.

Remarks on behalf of Gov. Markell

Delaware Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee, former UD Extension specialist and Worrilow Award recipient in 1995, brought remarks from Gov. Jack Markell and kudos for Gelb.

Kee said previous recipients review the resumes and make recommendations for the award. “You set a high bar,” Kee said.

Kee shared remarks of behalf of the governor and the administration’s efforts to promote Delaware agriculture and its continued competitiveness in a global market.

“Gov. Markell appreciates the economic importance of agriculture, as a way of life and for the cultural traditions that are a part of Delaware,” Kee said.

Kee cited the success of the Young Farmer’s Program, which offers zero percent interest to enable the purchase of land and assists the next generation of farmers in the settlement process.

“The governor understands the need to sustain our profitability and keep on the competitive edge in ag,” Kee said.

Through a strategic fund, the Markell administration supports infrastructure and businesses that are agricultural fixtures in Delaware, including Perdue, Mountaire, Vlasic and Hanover. “We want to keep them here and allow them to compete in a global economy,” Kee said.

At the breakfast Kee shared that Markell acknowledged the Delaware Rural Irrigation Program (DRIP) in his recent State of the State address. Through the investment of strategic funds, Delaware farmers are able to invest in new irrigation systems. In the past, Delaware has gone from 25,000 acres to 130,000 acres of irrigated cropland. “Farmers made that investment. That is why agriculture works in Delaware,” he said.

Nutrient management

Also at the event, Carper saluted Delaware agriculture and its willingness to face inland bay pollution head on by taking the lead in the formation of the Nutrient Management Commission in the 1990s.

Dave Baker, chair of the commission, and William Vanderwende, vice-chair, were recognized for their efforts and were presented with framed copies of Congressional Record statements issued on Dec. 14, 2011.

“In our state the ag community stood up really tall,” Carper said. He recognized the leadership of Baker and other farmers who created an enviable model for the nation to follow.

“It is incredible what you put into it,” Carper said. “It is amazing what we accomplish when we work together.”

Article by Michele Walfred, also viewable on UDaily

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Feb 16: Delmarva Dairy Day

January 10, 2012 under CANR News, Cooperative Extension

Delmarva Dairy Day returns to Hartly Fire Hall in Hartly, Delaware this year on Thursday February 16, 2012 from 9:30 am- 2:30 pm.  The educational program features well known experts from across the region speaking on current issues facing the industry and an opportunity for nutrient management certification credits.

Marco Lopez from Vicor will be speaking on Optimal Parlor Techniques.  Jon Garber, from University of Pennsylvania will cover Protocols for Optimizing Somatic Cell Counts.  Following lunch by the Ladies Auxiliary and visiting with exhibitors and sponsors, Eric Young from the Miner Institute will talk about Best Nutrient Management Practices for the Crop, Cow and Farm followed by a talk from Eric Reid of Old Mill Troy on Maximizing Milk Production Through Forage Quality.  1.0 Delaware Nutrient Management certification credits will be awarded to attendees.

Participants will have the opportunity to visit with dairy industry vendors throughout the day and the University of Delaware will be offering tastes of their University of Delaware Creamery ice cream, manufactured at the UDairy Creamery on campus from milk produced by the UD dairy herd located in Newark.

Program registration is free and open to any producer or industry professional on the shore however attendees are asked to RSVP to Carol Hrupsa, at (302) 730-4000 or carolm@udel.edu by February 3rd so that they have an accurate count for set up and lunches.  If you have any special needs in accessing this program, please notify Carol in advance so that your needs can be accommodated.

Cooperative Extension Education in Agriculture and Home Economics, University of Delaware, Delaware State University and the United States Department of Agriculture cooperating.  Distributed in furtherance of Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914.  It is the policy of the Delaware Cooperative Extension System that no person shall be subjected to discrimination on the grounds of race, color, sex, disability, age, or national origin.

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Wickens weighs in on ‘War Horse’

January 3, 2012 under CANR News, Cooperative Extension

On the heels of the successful holiday film, War Horse, Carissa Wickens, University of Delaware Cooperative Extension equine specialist and assistant professor of animal science, was recently interviewed by National Geographic to get more information about the range of equine emotions portrayed in the movie. In the interview, Wickens touches on horses and their ability to remember humans, how horses react to fear, and how horses can form strong social bonds with other horses. To read the whole interview, conducted by Amanda Fiegl, visit the National Geographic website.

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University’s Kniel, Everts join study of produce safety

December 9, 2011 under CANR News, Cooperative Extension

Researchers at the University of Delaware are participating in a project that is focused on increasing produce safety and delivering more trustworthy salad fixings.

Total funding for the University of Maryland-led project amounts to $9 million, with $5.4 million in contributions coming from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture and substantial industry funds.

The three-year study promises to be one of the most comprehensive studies of fresh produce safety ever conducted.

Produce safety has been a hot topic ever since 2006, when a deadly batch of spinach killed three people and sickened hundreds of Americans. The project will involve extensive testing and data collection by industry, supplemented by field experiments involving eight other university and federal laboratories around the country.

Kali Kniel, associate professor in UD’s Department of Animal and Food Sciences, and Kathryne Everts, professor and Cooperative Extension specialist in plant pathology at Maryland with a joint appointment at UD, are part of the University of Delaware team.

“Since the large outbreak of E. coli in 2006 which was traced back to spinach grown in the Salinas Valley of California, produce commodities have been under great scrutiny,” Kniel said of the project. “As we all know fresh fruits and vegetables are grown outside, which puts them at great risk for coming in contact with biological hazards like pathogenic bacteria and viruses. There are some processes that growers and packers can do to reduce the risk but the science is still not there to completely understand what those are. This project will help to resolve that for very important and ‘high-risk’ products, including leafy greens and tomatoes.”

Kniel explained the role that she and Everts will play in the study, saying, “Dr. Everts and I will be working with the farmers and packers to both develop metrics and to disseminate the science-based results of the project.  I am particularly looking forward to working with regional growers and packers to help them deal with the food safety challenges including increased biological testing and best practices for safe compost and water use.”

Robert Buchanan, a University of Maryland professor and director of its Center for Food Safety and Security Systems, is heading the research initiative.

In addition to UD and Maryland, other universities involved include Ohio State University, Rutgers University, the University of California Davis, the University of Florida and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The USDA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will be involved in the research as well.

The initiative’s industry partners — representing more than 90 percent of the leafy greens and tomato production in the United States — will conduct about 200,000 separate tests during the project to measure the presence of pathogens.

“This project is very unique in that it has the support of the industry on a significant scale. We have a great team of scientists and great industry support,” Kniel said.

The research aims to create the scientific basis for detailed safe, hygienic practices in farming, packing, transporting and storing fresh produce.

The idea is to prevent water, air or ground sources of pathogen contamination by setting standards or benchmarks that can be applied in a variety of growing regions and countries.

The study will examine questions such as how far apart do you need to keep a lettuce patch from pigs or other farm animals to prevent bacterial contamination and what kinds of barriers are needed to prevent contaminated water from reaching crops?

Members of the research team said they believe the project will give regulators, farmers, packers and others along the supply chain the scientific and technological knowledge needed to develop and defend produce safety protocols, or “metrics” as the industry calls them.

At the production stage, the research will focus on air, water and other environmental factors related to potential contamination by pathogens; risks during harvesting, packing, and processing; as well as temperature and other handling concerns as produce moves to market.

Photos by Ambre Alexander

This story can also be viewed on UDaily > >

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CANR Holiday Gifts

December 6, 2011 under CANR News

Need a holiday gift for someone that’s distinctively Delaware? Think about a blanket or skein of yarn made from the wool of University of Delaware sheep.

Products featured by Blue Hen Blankets and Yarn, established in 2009, are made with wool from UD’s flock of Dorset sheep at the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

All proceeds from the sale of Blue Hen Blankets and Yarn help to support to the undergraduate large animal teaching programs of the Department of Animal and Food Sciences.

Two blankets sizes are available: lap throws ($100) and queen-sized blankets ($175).

The un-dyed natural wool blankets are edged in blue in true UD spirit.  Each blanket is labeled with an individual serial number.  Customers can request a specific serial number for a surcharge of $10 per item  (subject to availability based on a total of 200 throws and 25 blankets produced in 2010).

Yarn is ideal for making natural handcrafts. Four-ounce hands are available in un-dyed natural ($10), blue ($12) and yellow ($12).

Blankets and yarn are available for purchase at the UDairy Creamery store. If you are not able to visit the Creamery, visit the Blue Hen Blankets website to complete an online order form.  Shipping is available for an additional fee.

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Brannick brings Veterinary Pathology experience to CANR

November 17, 2011 under CANR News

After leaving Philadelphia in 2006 to head to Ohio State University (OSU) for veterinary school, Erin Brannick thought that she and her husband were done with the east coast. “We both decided—or we thought—that we were mid-westerners,” said Brannick. Little did she know that in five years time, she’d be back by the Atlantic, working at the University of Delaware.

Hired in September, Brannick, an assistant professor in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences and the director of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) Comparative Pathology Laboratory, said that she knew UD was the place for her the moment she arrived for her interview. “I love UD and the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. I would say that from the moment I came for my interview, it was immediately this sense of peace and this sense of home.”

Brannick said that all of her colleagues have been wonderful and loves how open everyone is to research collaboration. She notes that she has “been really impressed with the caliber of the students as well. I’ve gotten wonderful chances to meet quite a few of the pre-veterinary students as they’ve come in to talk with me about various things. Just to hear about their experiences here and how excited they are about the University and what it has to offer has been very encouraging.”

Brannick has already met with potential students as well, serving as a recruit for the students interested in the University. After sitting in on a single recruiting session for Kimberly Yackoski, assistant dean for student services at CANR, Brannick recalls that the very next day, Yackoski asked if she could meet with a recruit as early as that Friday. Brannick joked, “ ‘Do you think I already know enough to do this?’ But it was a lot of fun. I had a great student. I remember my own undergrad recruiting sessions where you go and talk with professors and I remember the ones that really stood out to me, so I hope to provide that to students considering UD.”

Having completed her undergraduate degree at Wittenburg University, a liberal arts college in Springfield, Ohio, Brannick went on to veterinary school at OSU where she earned her veterinary degree (DVM) in 2006 and then her masters degree and ACVP-board certification in veterinary pathology in 2010.

It was near the end of her stint in OSU veterinary school that Brannick decided that she wanted to be a veterinary pathologist instead of a small animal private practitioner. Brannick likened veterinary pathology to putting together pieces of a puzzle, connecting the dots between healthy and un-healthy animal tissue, and then diagnosing a disease. “Compared to what I would expect in a normal tissue, what is different? And when you see something different, whether it’s inflammation or cancer or a degenerative process or anything, then it’s up to you to put the pieces together.”

UD will benefit from this pathology expertise as Brannick heads the Comparative Pathology Laboratory. The lab is located in Worrilow Hall and Brannick said that she works there with Joanne Kramer, a research associate in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences. While the majority of their work supports the poultry diagnostic laboratories of Delaware and Maryland, the two “welcome outside submissions, even outside of our department, and we’re happy to collaborate when people need advice or just thoughts on how to proceed with collecting tissues.”

Another area where Brannick will help CANR is that she is a valuable resource for any student interested in applying to veterinary school. Having served on the veterinary admissions committee at OSU, Brannick has been involved behind the scenes and knows what admissions committees are looking for in candidates.

“The big things that veterinary schools are going to look for are strong academic skills, strong leadership and involvement both in the University and also in community,” in addition to varied animal experience and strong communication skills.

Brannick said that she welcomes students and faculty to stop by her office, 41 Townsend Hall, to discuss plans for veterinary school or upcoming research projects.

“I would say that I have an open door policy, even when my door is closed. When you’re doing diagnostic work, you sometimes have to concentrate so carefully that it’s easier to work when the doors are closed but anybody is welcome at anytime.”

Entering her third month of working at the University of Delaware, Brannick is indeed happy to have returned to the east coast and excited to call CANR home.

Article by Adam Thomas

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High school students get a chance to explore CANR

November 2, 2011 under CANR News

Thirty high school students interested in studying food science, plant and soil science and poultry science at the University of Delaware’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) had a chance to take a closer look at those fields on Friday, Oct. 28, as part of the college’s Exploration Day.

The day started with a continental breakfast in the Townsend Hall Commons followed by a reception at which Blake Meyers, the Edward F. and Elizabeth Goodman Rosenberg Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences and chair of the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, and Kali Kniel, associate professor of animal and food sciences, welcomed the students to the college.

Meyers talked about how agriculture is one of the bright spots in the nation’s economy and highlighted key points about the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, such as the low student-to-faculty ratio, which allows for a wealth of opportunities for internships and research programs.

“Our department spans a wide range of interests from landscape design, which is more art and design influence, through to plant protection, environmental soil science and plant molecular biology, where we have a lot of researchers doing exciting cutting edge research on plant genomics. Today we have an opportunity to explore each of these areas and really see what we’re doing in the department,” said Meyers.

Kniel focused on those students who came to learn more about food and poultry science, saying, “I think that this is a really exciting time for us to be involved in agriculture, in particular with the production of food of all kinds. Food is important to us — how we grow food, how we produce food, how we do product development, how we want to produce healthy food and how we get food to people. We’re going to explore some of those things and you’re going to see how important and exciting agriculture is and how innovation is top of the line when it comes to product development.”

After a presentation on admissions and scholarships by Heidi Mulherin, UD admissions counselor, the students divided into three groups — one for students interested in food science, one for plant science and one for poultry science.

The food science students got to visit the UDairy Creamery in the morning, where they tried their hand at making ice cream and participated in an ice cream taste test. In the afternoon, they had lessons on topics such as food packaging and investigating a foodborne illness outbreak.

The plant and soil science students learned about suburban landscaping with Sue Barton, associate professor of plant and soil science, toured the Fischer Greenhouse and explored a plant cell with Janine Sherrier, professor of plant and soil sciences at the Delaware Biotechnology Institute.

As for the poultry science students, they spent time in Allen Laboratory doing a variety of activities that included hands-on tracheal swabs of chickens with Robert Alphin, an instructor in animal and food sciences and the manager of the Agricultural Experiment Center, and Carl Schmidt, associate professor of animal and food sciences. These students learned about gene sequencing, avian domestication and evolution, and how using an electroencephalogram can assist in monitoring animal welfare.

The three groups had lunch together in the Townsend Hall Commons before breaking off for panel discussions with current UD students and alumni from their respective areas of interest.

Kimberly Yackoski, assistant dean for student services at CANR, said, “One of the main goals of Exploration Day is to introduce curious, science-minded high school students to the exciting and innovative things going on in our college. This day truly offers the ‘student explorer’ a better understanding of the diverse disciplines within our programs of study.”

One alumnus who was particularly insightful was Matt Sullenberger, who graduated in 2010 and had gone through Exploration Day as a high school student both for plant and soil science and food science.

“I think the best thing about Exploration Day was the hands-on activities that we did with the actual professors,” Sullenberger said. “It was sort of mimicking the type of classes we would have when we got here. It got me really excited about the programs.”

Sullenberger said that Exploration Day helped him get his college career off to the right start and gave him more information about a subject he thought he wanted to study but didn’t know that much about. “One of the big reasons why I did the food science track was that I didn’t know much about food science until I visited Delaware. I participated in Exploration Day partly to learn more about that.”

As for students who participated in Exploration Day this year, Jim and Wesley Johnson, twin brothers who attend high school in New Jersey and are interested in plant and soil science, said that they found Exploration Day to be both fun and beneficial.

“I really enjoyed the suburban landscaping class and it was interesting to hear Sue Barton talk about how instead of having 95 percent of your lawn be lawn, you can have meadows and things like that. It was pretty interesting; I never really knew that,” said Jim Johnson.

Wesley Johnson said that he would recommend Exploration Day to any student interested in the college because you get to “meet the teachers and see what it’s like in the classrooms.”

Kara Kowalski, a senior from New York City who is interested in food science, said that she enjoyed making ice cream at the creamery. “Our flavor was cake batter with chocolate covered pretzels and a graham cracker swirl.”

Kowalski said she liked “the sensory technology part of it, so I really liked the hands-on stuff, like smelling and tasting different flavors. We did a lot of that in the creamery, so that was really cool.”

The students who attended this year’s Exploration Day walked away with a new understanding of how fun and exciting learning can be at UD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

Article by Adam Thomas

Photos by Danielle Quigley

This article can also be viewed on UDaily > >

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Week of Oct. 24: Food Day events

October 22, 2011 under CANR News, Events

The University of Delaware community is invited to join the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Food Science Club, Dining Services, Food Bank of Delawareand millions of Americans in celebration of national Food Day on Monday, Oct. 24.

Food Day is a national campaign to draw attention to celebrate healthy, affordable foods produced in a humane, sustainable way and to fix the food system by:

  • Reducing obesity and diet-related disease by promoting safe, healthy foods.
  • Supporting sustainable family farms and cutting subsides to huge agribusiness.
  • Ending urban and rural “food deserts” by providing access to healthy foods.
  • Protecting the environment and farm animals by reforming factory farms.
  • Promoting children’s health by curbing junk-food marketing aimed at kids.
  • Obtaining fair wages for all workers in the food system.

The Food Science Club will host two events on Monday, Oct. 24.  From 12:30-2:30 p.m., club members will be at Trabant University Center with information about Food Day’s mission, signing up students to volunteer with the Food Bank of Delaware.

Also on Monday, from 5:30-7 p.m. in the Townsend Hall Commons, the Food Science Club and other food-related clubs at UD will host a panel discussion about important food related issues.  After the discussion, participants will be invited to stay and carve local pumpkins and enjoy local UDairy Creamery ice cream. Participants are encouraged to bring non-perishable food items to the event to donate to the Food Bank of Delaware.

In addition, throughout the week, bins will be available at all residential dining halls for students to drop off non-perishable food items for the Food Bank of Delaware.

On Thursday, Oct. 27, UD Dining Services will host Local Garden Harvest dinners in Kent, Pencader, Russell and Rodney dining halls from 5-7:30 p.m. featuring local and sustainable ingredients.

The UD Dining Services menu for the Local Garden Harvest dinner includes:

  • Butternut squash and apple soup made with locally grown butternut squash, roasted and blended with apples and farm fresh cream.
  • Chicken, potato and kale soup made with locally grown kale served in a tomato base soup.
  • Carved apple glazed pork loin served with a side of caramel apple bread pudding.
  • Monterey Aquarium Seafood Watch approved flounder seasoned and encrusted, served with sweet and tangy cabbage slaw and fresh Old Bay chips.
  • Homemade herb infused biscuits topped with exotic local mushroom ragout.
  • Zucchini, squash and onion sauté.
  • Locally grown, baked sweet potatoes with toppings (honey butter, cinnamon and sugar, marshmallows).
  • Chicken and waffles drizzled with UD’s own farm fresh Dare to Bee honey.
  • Organic whole wheat pasta served in a light tomato sauce.
  • Bacon, apple and cheddar panini on eight-grain sliced bread.
  • Succotash salad.
  • Mixed green salad with apples, cranberries and candied pecans topped with a Chaddsford Winery vinaigrette.
  • Assorted dinner rolls.
  • Gooey pumpkin cake.
  • Cranberry and apple strudel with maple glaze.
  • UDairy Creamery taste testing (and voting) of final two contest flavors: Blue Hen Tracks and All Nighter.
  • UDairy Creamery Pumpkin Roll ice cream.
  • Spiced hot apple cider.

Sponsored by the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest, Food Day is sponsored nationally by more than 50 organizations including Slow Food USA, the Sierra Club, the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition and the National Farmers Market Coalition.

View this article on UDaily.

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