Global symposium held at UD leads to publication of nutrient management papers

August 12, 2013 under CANR News

Nutrient Management symposiumTom Sims, professor in the University of Delaware’s Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, recently served as the guest editor for a special collection of papers for the Journal of Environmental Quality (JEQ) titled “Nutrient Management Challenges and Progress in China.”

The collection is the result of work completed after leading researchers from China attended the Global Issues in Nutrient Management: Science, Technology and Policy symposium hosted by UD in 2011.

The symposium was co-sponsored by UD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the University of Pennsylvania, the Delaware Environmental Institute, China Agricultural University, Wageningen University and UD’s Institute for Global Studies.

The goal of the symposium was to foster global discussions on nutrient management-related research and policy issues pertaining to the challenge of feeding the world’s growing population while protecting environmental resources.

“After the conference, a number of scientists from China who attended were quite interested in publishing their findings in a major international journal,” said Sims. “I approached the editor of the Journal of Environmental Quality and asked if he would be interested in a special collection of papers that could be published as a group and focus on the topics that were covered at this conference, specifically about the agri-environmental situation in China.”

The special collection for the JEQ featured six papers in all, two co-authored by Sims and the rest authored by scholars from China and Europe who attended the symposium.

The papers included:

  • “Advances and Challenges for Nutrient Management in China in the 21st Century” by J.T. Sims, L. Ma, O. Oenema, Z. Dou and F.S. Zhang;
  • “An Analysis of Developments and Challenges in Nutrient Management in China” by L. Ma, W.F. Zhang, W.Q. Ma, G.L. Velthof, O. Oenema and F. S. Zhang;
  • “The Driving Forces for Nitrogen and Phosphorus Flows in the Food Chain of China, 1980 to 2010” by Y. Hou, L. Ma, Z.L. Gao, F.H. Wang, J.T. Sims, W.Q. Ma and F.S. Zhang;
  • “An Analysis of China’s Fertilizer Policies: Impacts on the Industry, Food Security, and the Environment” by Yuxuan Li, Weifeng Zhang, Lin Ma, Gaoqiang Huang, Oene Oenema, Fusuo Zhang and Zhengxia Dou;
  • “Phosphorus in China’s Intensive Vegetable Production Systems: Overfertilization, Soil Enrichment, and Environmental Implications” by Zhengjuan Yan, Pengpeng Liu, Yuhong Li, Lin Ma, Ashok Alva, Zhengxia Dou, Qing Chen and Fusuo Zhang; and
  • “Nitrogen and Phosphorus Use Efficiencies in Dairy Production in China” by Z.H. Bai, L. Ma, O. Oenema, Q. Chen and F.S. Zhang.

The papers represent the latest in an ongoing collaboration between CANR and China Agricultural University (CAU) that dates back to 2008, when Sims was invited to make a keynote presentation at the Second International Nutrient Management Workshop, held in Shijiazhuang, China.

At that time, Sims said, “At CANR, our nutrient management efforts have been recognized globally. By using our years of research and extension experience on nutrient management in Delaware, we hope to put China’s researchers in a better position to solve their agri-environmental problems.”

Since then, the relationship between CANR and CAU has grown.

In 2009, CANR signed a general agreement with CAU and also formalized, in cooperation with the University of Pennsylvania, a memorandum of understanding with the CAU College of Resources and Environmental Sciences (CRES).

This memorandum outlined a range of joint research and academic activities between UD, UPenn and CAU.  It led to the initiation of a variety of collaborative activities and supported multiple trips to CAU by CANR faculty.

CANR also hosted a CAU delegation, sponsored a symposium by leading CAU scientists at the 2009 international meetings of the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America and Soil Science Society of America, and hosted four young CAU scientists — one for 18 months — to discuss and design joint research projects.

A “3+2” master of science degree program between CANR and CRES has been discussed that would allow CAU students to complete their undergraduate degree in three years at CAU then enter a two-year master of science degree program at UD, receiving two degrees in a five-year period.

Article by Adam Thomas

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CANR holds symposium addressing global nutrient management issues

September 28, 2011 under CANR News

The University of Delaware College of Agriculture and Natural Resources hosted the fourth international symposium focusing on “Global Issues in Nutrient Management: Science, Technology and Policy,” from Aug. 21-24. Previous symposia were held in the Netherlands and China, hosted by Wageningnen University and China Agricultural University.

The international symposium addressed global issues and trends in nutrient management and focused on how agricultural management practices, technological advances and global or regional policies affect both nutrient use efficiency in the food chain and the quality of the environment in different parts of the world. More than 100 participants from six different countries attended the symposium.

Themes of the symposium included worldwide challenges in the management of nutrients to produce a safe and secure food supply while protecting the quality of the global environment; a focus on current issues and trends in nutrient management in China, the European Union and the United States; advances in nutrient management science and technology and the adaptation of recent innovations to meet global needs; and developing national and international policies for nutrient management in today’s rapidly changing global economy.

This year’s plenary speaker was Oene Oenema, a professor at Wageningen University in the Netherlands and an internationally recognized expert in the field of nutrient management and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, who said that he thought “there were very high quality presentations” at this year’s symposium.

Oenema arrived for the symposium a day early and was able to walk around the UD campus, which he described as looking “very rich, clean, new, and well maintained.”

Anjan Datta, program officer of the United Nations Environment Program who currently leads the Secretariat of the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management (GPNM), also spoke at the symposium and he said that he thought the symposium offered a great “exchange of information” among experts doing research in different parts of the world. Dutta said that he thought “listening to and learning from different cases” was a very beneficial aspect of the symposium.

Participants spent four days listening to and participating in talks on diverse topics ranging from “Advances in Nutrient Management for Major Crops in China” to “Nutrient Management Challenges in Africa: Nutrient Scarcity and Soil Degradation Endanger Food Security.” During the symposium, participants were able to engage in discussions and debate a wide range of topics related to nutrient management science, technology and policy.

One highlight of the symposium included a keynote panel discussing the “Nutrient Management Challenges and Progress in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.” Panel participants included members from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Delaware Department of Agriculture, Pennsylvania State University, and the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC).

After listening to the keynote panel on Monday, the participants spent the last day of the symposium taking an up close look at the Chesapeake Bay, a highlight that was thoroughly appreciated, said one of the keynote speakers, Phil Jordan, principal scientist on the Agricultural Catchments Program for Teagasc, the agriculture and food development authority in Ireland, and a faculty member in the School of Environmental Sciences at the University of Ulster.

Jordan said he enjoyed the symposium for the range of topics presented from around the world. He added that he relished the opportunity to take a tour of the Chesapeake Bay as part of the symposium because “I heard a lot of the research [on the Chesapeake Bay] over the years so it’s nice to see these places rather than just read about them.”

The symposium was co-sponsored by UD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the University of Pennsylvania, the Delaware Environmental Institute, China Agricultural University, Wageningen University, and UD’s Institute for Global Studies.

Article by Adam Thomas

Photos by Danielle Quigley

This article can also be viewed on UDaily > >

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UD to host symposium on nutrient management science, technology, policy

May 31, 2011 under CANR News

The fourth annual international symposium addressing global issues and trends in nutrient management will be held at the University of Delaware, Aug. 21-24.

The symposium focuses on how agricultural management practices, technological advances and global or regional priorities affect both nutrient use efficiency in the food chain, and the quality of our environment in different regions of the world.

Key themes of the symposium include:

  • Worldwide challenges in the management of nutrients to produce a safe and secure food supply while protecting the quality of the global environment.
  • Focus on current issues and trends in nutrient management in China, the European Union, and the United States.
  • Advances in nutrient management science and technology, and adapting recent innovations to meet global needs.
  • Developing national and international policies for nutrient management in today’s rapidly changing global economy.

The symposium is co-sponsored by the University of Delaware College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR), Delaware Environmental Institute, China Agricultural University (CAU), and Wageningen University.

For more information or to register, visit the symposium website.

The deadline for abstract submissions is July 1. The deadline for registration is Aug. 1.

The symposium is the most recent joint project conducted between CANR and CAU since the two universities signed a general agreement of cooperation in 2008. To date numerous scientists from UD and CAU have participated exchange programs, and have participated in joint workshops and conferences.

For more on the partnership, see the articles in UDaily and the UD Research magazine.

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CANR promotes nutrient management, water quality efforts in China

November 10, 2010 under CANR News

The University of Delaware College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) has recently taken a leadership role in organizing and presenting at two international symposia in Beijing, China. Through an ongoing partnership with China Agricultural University (CAU), CANR officials say they hope to provide sound advice and direction for the latest agricultural issues in China.

In 2008, UD signed an agreement with CAU and the University of Pennsylvania Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, to participate in joint research and exchange activities.

The fourth International Symposium on Phosphorus Dynamic in the Soil-Plant Continuum (ISPDSPC) provided a forum for international scientists to share their latest research findings and knowledge on phosphorus dynamics and management in food-producing and other managed and unmanaged ecosystems.

At this conference, keynote speeches were given by Donald Sparks, S. Hallock du Pont Chair of Soil Chemistry, and Tom Sims, deputy dean of CANR and T. A. Baker Professor of Soil and Environmental Chemistry.

Sims was a part of the international steering committee for this event. There were approximately 300 people in attendance.

Following ISPDSPC was the third International Workshop on Nutrient Management Technology and Policy, which was hosted by CAU and UD, and also joined by Wageningen University and Research Centre of the Netherlands.

Sims presented a keynote talk entitled “Nutrient Management Strategies in the USA: Integrating Science, Policy, and Management to Sustain Agricultural Productivity and Protect the Environment.”

David Hansen, associate professor of soil and environmental quality and Cooperative Extension specialist for nutrient management, spoke about the issues related to the development of a comprehensive nutrient management training program in China.

This conference also provided CAU graduate students with a training course on nutrient management tools and nutrient balance at different scales. U.S. and European experts alike shared their experiences with and how to improve upon best nutrient management practices and policies.

After the conference in Beijing, CAU hosted a tour of the new Quzhou agricultural research center, where a large-scale Chinese project focused on improving nutrient management, protecting water quality, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions is now underway.

“At CANR, our nutrient management efforts have been recognized globally,” Sims said. “By using our years of research and extension experience on nutrient management in Delaware and Pennsylvania, we hope to put China’s researchers in a better position to solve their agri-environmental problems.”

In August 2011, the fourth International Workshop on Nutrient Management Technology and Policy will be hosted at UD. For more information about this workshop, see the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management website.

Article by Rachael Dubinsky

This article can also be read on UDaily by clicking here.

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UD, China Agricultural University organize symposium

November 30, 2009 under CANR News
University of Delaware and China Agricultural University Symposium

University of Delaware and China Agricultural University Symposium

Four leading Chinese scientists participated in an invitational symposium organized by the University of Delaware College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and China Agricultural University at the recent International Meetings of the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, held Nov. 1-5 in Pittsburgh.

Symposium organizers were Tom Sims, deputy dean of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and T.A. Baker Professor of Soil and Environmental Chemistry, and Fusuo Zhang, dean and professor in the CAU College of Resources and Environmental Sciences.

Read the full story on UDaily >>

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