Inaugural Blue Hens CAN unified campus food drive tops two tons

November 19, 2012 under CANR News

The inaugural Blue Hens CAN unified campus food drive closed Friday, with the University of Delaware collecting more than two tons of nonperishable food items to stock the Food Bank of Delaware.

Blue Hens CAN — a joint venture of the University’s College of Health Sciences (CHS), the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) and the Food Bank of Delaware — featured a UD food collection bus parked at a different campus location each day of this week to accept items donated by the campus community.

The goods were then transported to the Food Bank of Delaware at the end of each day.

Assisting with collections at the bus on Friday were representatives of the Dietetics and Nutrition Club, the Interfraternity Council, the Occupational Therapy Club and the Food Science Club.

A large donation Friday came from UD’s Sussex County sites in Georgetown. UD students, the Sussex County Master Gardeners, 4-H Club members and staff from the Carvel Research and Education Center, along with participants from Delaware Technical Community College and the Delmarva Poultry Industry, combined to donate 389 pounds of food.

The total for the Blue Hens CAN effort during the week topped two tons, according to a representative of the Food Bank of Delaware.

Blue Hens CAN organizers said additional donations are anticipated and an official final total will be announced in the near future.

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Blue Hens CAN: Unified campus food drive to benefit Food Bank of Delaware

November 1, 2012 under CANR News

The University of Delaware and the Food Bank of Delaware will launch a weeklong campus-wide food drive called Blue Hens CAN from Monday, Nov. 12, through Friday, Nov. 16, to benefit those state residents who are straining to afford food.

Blue Hens CAN, a joint venture of the College of Health Sciences (CHS), the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) and the Food Bank of Delaware, will feature a UD food collection bus parked at a different campus location each day of the week to accept items donated by the campus community.

The bus will be parked at the following locations on the following days:

  • Monday, Nov. 12: Mentor’s Circle, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Nov. 13: Laird Campus, between Smith and Independence halls, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Nov. 14: Mentor’s Circle, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
  • Thursday, Nov. 15: South Campus, next to the UDairy Creamery, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
  • Friday, Nov. 16: Mentor’s Circle, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

University President Patrick Harker and Patricia Beebe, Food Bank of Delaware president and CEO, will be on hand to kick off the event during a ceremony at Mentor’s Circle on Monday, Nov. 12, at 9 a.m.

Said Harker of the event, “I know this active, engaged campus community — a community that lives the principle of service every day — can come together to help end hunger in Delaware. I’m thrilled that we’re partnering with the Food Bank of Delaware — such a vital organization to so many families — and I’m excited to see the outcome of our efforts.”

“The support we have received from the University of Delaware community has been outstanding,” said Beebe. “We are looking forward to a coordinated food drive amongst all members of the University in order to collect more food for Delawareans struggling to put meals on the table. We hope the excitement surrounding Blue Hens CAN will bring in not only food, but enthusiasm for helping to alleviate hunger in the First State.”

There will be a raffle with prizes for individuals who donate items, with individuals who donate an item receiving a raffle ticket with a chance to win.

Prizes include:

  • UDairy Creamery ice cream gift basket;
  • $100 iTunes gift card from UD’s Apple Authorized Campus Store;
  • Wool blanket, made from wool of UD sheep, a $100 value; and
  • Ninety T-shirts donated by University Student Centers for the first 30 participants who come to each location. (For Mentor’s Circle, the shirts will only be handed out on Monday).

A separate competition for groups who enter items collectively will also be held. Groups are asked to submit their items together and label them clearly using the group’s full name and not abbreviations. The items will then be taken and weighed at the Food Bank of Delaware.

The group that donates the most food will win a free ice cream social from the UDairy Creamery ice cream team.

This article can also be viewed on UDaily.

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Unified campus food drive to benefit Food Bank of Delaware

September 19, 2012 under CANR News

According to a recent Gallup poll, more than 22 percent of Delawareans struggle to put food on the table. Only two states have higher percentages of residents who do not have enough money for food.

The Food Bank of Delaware distributed 6.2 million pounds of food last year, providing help to one out of every four residents in the First State.

Many partners helped provide the food distributed by the Food Bank. For example, the University of Delaware’s Garden for the Community — a cooperative partnership between UD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR), CANR Ag College Council, Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners and the Food Bank of Delaware — donated 16,484 pounds of fresh, locally grown vegetables in 2012.

While these recent efforts by UD and the Food Bank of Delaware have gone a long way to help those in need, there is still more that can be done.

With this in mind, a new program called Blue Hens CAN has been established, to help the entire UD community join forces to meet the needs of Delawareans straining to afford food.

“Over the years, various UD groups and organizations have successfully organized collections of food throughout the year,” says Susan Hall, deputy dean of the College of Health Sciences (CHS). “Our hope is that this unified, campuswide effort will synthesize all of these individual campaigns and ultimately result in a much larger donation for the Food Bank.”

“Blue Hens CAN is our service mission in action,” says UD President Patrick Harker. “I know this active, engaged campus community — a community that lives the principle of service every day — can come together to help end hunger in Delaware. I’m thrilled that we’re partnering with the Food Bank of Delaware — such a vital organization to so many families — and I’m excited to see the outcome of our efforts.”

“The support we have received from the University of Delaware community has been outstanding,” said Food Bank of Delaware President and CEO Patricia Beebe. “We are looking forward to a coordinated food drive amongst all members of the University in order to collect more food for Delawareans struggling to put meals on the table. We hope the excitement surrounding Blue Hens CAN will bring in not only food, but enthusiasm for helping to alleviate hunger in the First State.”

The program, a joint venture between CHS, CANR and the Food Bank of Delaware, is scheduled for the week of Nov. 12-16.

“The plan is that — thanks to the help of UD Parking and Transportation Services — each day of the week, we will have a UD bus parked at a different campus location for an advertised period of several hours,” explains CANR deputy dean Tom Sims. “Student volunteers, led by clubs in CANR and CHS, will be on hand to accept and record donations from various groups and help load them into the vehicle.”

The bus will be parked on north, east, west, south and central campuses for one day each during the week, with the exact bus locations to be determined at a later date.

Prizes will be awarded for participation, and the hope is that Blue Hens CAN will become an annual event, similar to the UD campus blood drive, where groups throughout the university join together to benefit a single cause.

“There is so much need, even in our small state,” says Sims, “and this is a great opportunity for our students, faculty and staff to make a difference.”

Article by Diane Kukich and Adam Thomas

This article can also be viewed on UDaily.

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Ted Haas AG ’71 returns to campus for PT study

July 11, 2011 under CANR News

Forty years after graduating from the University of Delaware, Ted Haas found himself commuting to campus twice a week from Lewes, Del. But this time around, Haas wasn’t a student—he was a research subject.

A lacrosse player at UD from 1968 to 1971, Haas maintained an active lifestyle as an adult, jogging, cycling, and playing racquetball and softball. But by the time he reached his late fifties, his competitiveness caught up with him, and he began to experience pain and stiffness in his lower back when he got out of bed in the morning.

In April 2011, an ad in the Wilmington News Journal caught Haas’s attention. The UD Department of Physical Therapy was recruiting subjects for a study to determine whether a combination of low back stabilization exercises and electrical stimulation is a more effective treatment than back stabilization exercises alone for older adults with low back pain.

Haas met the criteria for the study and enrolled. “It was an 85-mile trip each way,” he says, “but I figured it was worth it if it would help me with a good PT program.”

Haas didn’t miss a single appointment, and he faithfully did all of the between-sessions homework assigned by therapist Meg Sions, a Ph.D. student working on the research under the advisement of Assistant Prof. Gregory Hicks.

The hard work paid off for this former athlete, with his post-treatment evaluation showing significant improvement in all measures.

“Ted demonstrated significant improvement per his objective testing in his low back pain, everyday function that was previously limited by his low back pain, physical mobility, balance, and back muscle endurance,” Sions says.

For Haas, participation in the research project not only addressed his physical problems but also served as a learning experience. “Meg taught me that it’s all about the core,” he says. “Strengthening the core helps to lower strain.”

“I’m not surprised that the treatment was so successful,” he adds. “I knew that the researchers and clinicians at the University would bring the most innovative approach to my back problems. In six weeks, Meg improved my quality of life, and I look for further advances in the next six weeks as I continue the program at home. My goal is to be back on the racquetball courts with my friends here in the Rehoboth-Lewes area three months from now.”

About the research

The study in which Haas participated is led by Gregory Hicks, assistant professor in the Department of Physical Therapy. Hicks’s research focuses on chronic lower back pain in older adults. Meg Sions is a Ph.D. candidate in UD’s interdisciplinary Biomechanics and Movement Science (BIOMS) graduate program. Her doctoral research is aimed at determining the impact of chronic low back pain on physical and psychosocial function in older adults.

About Ted Haas

Ted Haas earned his bachelor’s degree in agriculture in 1971. He spent his entire career working for the University of Maryland extension service as an agronomy specialist for the Eastern Shore. After retiring from the Maryland faculty several years ago, Haas served as a park ranger at Cape Henlopen State Park and as a dockmaster for the city of Lewes.

The University of Delaware has been a family affair for Haas. Related alumni include his wife, Patricia Lynch Haas (1970); his daughters, Kristen Haas Perez (1996) and Gretchen Haas Wyshock (1999); his sister, Carla Haas Spadaro (1966); his brother-in-law, Gregory Lynch (1976); and his mother-in-law, Jane Kenney Lynch (1940).

Article by Diane Kukich

Photos by Evan Krape

This article originally appeared in UDaily and is reposted here courtesy of the College of Health Sciences.

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