UD Embarks on New Study Abroad to Cambodia, Vietnam

December 18, 2012 under CANR News

January 2013 marks the beginning of an exciting journey for 12 adventurous students at the University of Delaware. In their Winter Study Abroad session, these students will embark on the University’s first expedition to Cambodia and Vietnam. The goal of this 27-day program is to give students the opportunity to explore the rich wildlife and unique history of Cambodia and Vietnam, while at the same time fulfilling two Wildlife Conservation courses: Conservation of Southeast Asian Wildlife and People and Wildlife of Southeast Asia. The students will venture on this journey with an Art study abroad program fulfilling–Indigenous Arts of Southeast Asia and Documentary Photography–led by Jon Cox, assistant professor of art.

The students will be blogging about their experience throughout winter session.

“All of our [conservation] programs have a human component, and look at how humans impact conservation. South East Asia has a long history, dating back much farther than most areas of the world,” says Jacob Bowman, associate professor of wildlife ecology, and one of the faculty members leading the study abroad session.

According to Bowman, these war-torn countries offer students an unusual view on culture and wildlife, as many of the region’s mountainous areas have been mostly untouched by humans (other than guerillas) throughout the war, thereby preserving the habitats of the indigenous animals.

“There are still tigers, elephants, leopards and a lot of large mammals left in some of these remote areas, partially because for a long time it was dangerous for people to go into these areas,” Bowman explains.

The program begins in Vietnam, where students visit ancient temples of Angkor Wat, journey through the Mekong River and the dated tunnels used in the Vietnam War. Next, in Cambodia, students will experience unique wildlife and learn first-hand about conservation issues. Students will study Cambodia’s history and people by visiting various locations, including sacred temples and the historical killing fields, where large numbers of people were killed after the Cambodian Civil War. It is from this visit to the killing fields that Bowman expects students to be the most affected.

“When you go there and see a tower of skulls from all the people that have been killed, it’s a powerful experience. Hopefully students walk away realizing how bad humans can be, and how we continue to not learn from our own historical mistakes.”

A strong conservation issue to be examined is how overpopulated countries over-hunt their wildlife, and how these countries could benefit from developing an eco-friendly balance. Says Bowman, “Because it [Asia] has such a large population, it tends to overexploit its resources. There is almost no wildlife here because of the economic dilemma. People care about the wildlife, but their situation prevents them from conserving. They are just trying to feed their families and survive day to day.”

While Bowman says the University supported his choice of studying in Cambodia and Vietnam, the group is still being careful in these areas. UD students will interact with students from The Royal University of Phnom Penh and will predominantly stay in hotels throughout the trip, as it is safer than camping.

Bowman, who along with Cox, has run numerous study abroad programs to Tanzania, Australia, and Antarctica, is very excited for this new trip, and for the students. “Being able to interact with the students in a way where you can get them thinking about things cognitively instead of just strict classroom assignments is very satisfying. If something happens, the group is small enough to talk about it.” He relates a story that on one of his trips to Africa, he came face to face with a lion at night. “Stuff like that is hard to put into words, but particular things happen on every trip, and that is what builds impressions.”

What Bowman really hopes each student walks away with is a new point of view. He hopes this journey will open their eyes about the challenges of conservation on an international arena, where they will witness a form of living very different from their own.

According to Carly Costello, a UD junior majoring in animal science and taking this in-demand program, “It’s all about the first-hand experience. I’m excited to experience another culture; everyday things that we think are ordinary are so different to them, and vice versa.”

Article by Samantha Walsh, UD Wildlife Conservation and Communication junior

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The Science of Wine 2013

October 25, 2012 under CANR News

During the upcoming winter session, Dr. Pamela Green will be offering The Science of Wine (PLSC167-010). The course is open to undergraduate students and anyone else who would like to register. Please see the Flyer 2013 PLSC167-010 for details. The enrollment limit is already set at its maximum, and the course filled up very quickly the last four years, so be sure to register ASAP. If you are not able to get a seat during registration, you might come to the first class and then check UDSIS periodically during the add/drop period to see whether any seats become available. Sometimes a few students drop during the first week.

 

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Winter Session: Flower Arranging

October 31, 2011 under CANR News

Two flower arranging courses will be offered by the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences during the 2012 Winter Session

Flower Arranging for Beginners (PLSC 120-010): This popular hands on 1 credit course helps students learn about handling flowers, tools/mechanics, floral design techniques, and different types of flowers and foliage.  The students will use fresh and a few artificial materials in their creations, and they will take home at least one (usually two) arrangements from each of the five classes!   The class will meet once a week in Fischer Greenhouse Laboratory on Tuesdays (1/3, 1/10, 1/17, 1/24, 1/31) from 1:15 – 4:15 P.M. during the winter session.  A $110.00 supply fee will be collected by the instructor.

Themed Flower Arrangements (PLSC 167-011): Another hands on 1 credit course helps students learn how to createthemed arrangements.  Some examples include:  arrangements with  winter,   St. Valentine’s Day, Asian, and autumn themes, to name a few.   Mostly fresh but a few artificial materials will be used in the creations.  Students will take home at least one (usually two) arrangements from each of the five classes!  The class will meet once a week in Fischer Greenhouse Laboratory on Thursdays (1/5, 1/12, 1/19, 1/26, and 2/2) from 1:15-4:15 P.M. during the winter session.  A $110.00 supply fee will be collected by the instructor.

For more information on either course contact Jim Swasey at jswasey@udel.edu.

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Winter Session: Science of Wine

October 28, 2011 under CANR News

During the upcoming winter session, Dr. Pamela Green will be offering The Science of Wine (PLSC167-010). The course is open to undergraduate students and anyone else who would like to register. The enrollment limit is already set at its maximum, and the course filled up very quickly the last three years, so be sure to register ASAP. If you are not able to get a seat during registration, you might come to the first class and then check UDSIS periodically during the add/drop period to see whether any seats become available. Sometimes a few students drop during the first week.

The Science of Wine is a one credit course held in GOR219 Tuesdays and Thursdays form 4:30-5:45pm.  Students will learn about the science of wine from the vine to the glass, including: aging and maturation, fermentation, plant growth and development, harvesting and crushing, growth conditions and propagation, the winemaking process, pests and soil, flavor and its perception.  The class is suitable for non-science majors.  Special guest lecturers include Gerret Copeland, owner of Bouchaine Vineyards in Napa Valley, CA, and Phil Pyle, Chef and Owner, Fair Hill Inn.

 

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