Alumni Weekend June 3-5

May 18, 2011 under CANR News, Events

The University’s third annual Alumni Weekend is just around the corner, June 3-5. From college receptions, to a 5K, the ever popular Mug Night and special reunion events, to events sponsored by each college and a picnic on the green, the weekend is sure to be a great place to reconnect with former students, classmates and friends.

The college has already SOLD OUT of its three behind the scenes UDairy Creamery tours/tastings on Saturday, but the Creamery will be open and anyone showing their Alumni Weekend badge will receive a discount that weekend.

Ten UD alumni (2 from CANR) will be inducted into the UD Wall of Fame at a ceremony on Saturday.

The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources specifically welcomes you to the college’s Alumni Reception on Friday night from 6-8pm at Kildare’s Irish Pub on Main Street in Newark.  The reception is free, but you must pre-register.

Registration for faculty members wishing to attend any portion of Alumni Weekend is available at www.UDconnection.com/faculty.  Alumni, staff, and friends can register at www.udel.edu/alumniweekend.

We hope to see you there!

 

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New Issue of UD Messenger Available

April 11, 2011 under CANR News, Cooperative Extension, Events

The current edition of the University of Delaware Messenger magazine, which is mailed to alumni, parents and friends, can be viewed online, where an interactive PDF version also is available.  In this issue, be sure to check out the feature article about CANR’s upcoming Ag Day event!

For the UDaily announcement, please click here.

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April 7: CANR Town Hall on former Chrysler site

April 4, 2011 under CANR News, Events

Join us for a CANR “Town Hall” Thursday, April 7, 2011 to learn from Alan Brangman (UD Architect and Campus Planner) about plans for the Chrysler site restoration and the opportunities that may be available for you to participate in the restoration through teaching, research, or extension programs.

CANR Town Hall: “Update on the UD Science and Technology Campus Plan (former Chrysler plant site)”
Alan Brangman, University of Delaware Architect & Campus Planner
Thursday, April 7th, 3:30 – 5 p.m.
Townsend Hall Commons

If you are unable to attend this meeting in person, please know that it will be available to be viewed on AdobeConnect at http://ud-canr.acrobat.com/townhall/

Restoration of the former Chrysler assembly plant site is now underway and UD is in the process of developing a comprehensive plan to convert this area into the “UD Science and Technology Campus”.

Please join Alan Brangman, the UD Architect & Campus Planner, to learn about the current status of the planning efforts, what we can expect to see occur in the near future and long-term, and – most importantly – opportunities for CANR faculty and students to play a role in the restoration of this site.

The “Town Hall”, featuring a presentation by Mr. Brangman and an opportunity for discussion and questions, will be held in the Townsend Hall Commons on Thursday, April 7th from 3:30 – 5 pm. A reception, featuring UDairy Ice cream will be held immediately after the Town Hall.

Thanks and please let me know if you have any questions.

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Ag Day exhibitor, vendor registration closes Friday, March 25

March 24, 2011 under CANR News, Events

Ag Day registration closes Friday, March 25, 2011 and payment is due no later than April 1.  We are excited for this annual event and welcome the chance to include you in our list of exhibitors, vendors, and sponsors.

This year’s even will be held on Saturday, April 30th from 10am-4pm rain or shine.  We had beautiful weather last year and record breaking attendance.  As such, we have made a few changes to Ag Day, making for an even better event experience for our visitors.  This year will be extra exciting as we hold the ribbon cutting for the NEW UDairy Creamery storefront and processing facility!

Registration is ONLY available online this year.  Please visit the Ag Day website to register.

Registration is DUE BY FRIDAY MARCH 25, 2011 AND is subject to approval by the Ag Day Planning Team.  Only organizations/entities with missions relevant to the University of Delaware, agriculture and/or natural resources are accepted.  Once registration is closed, you will receive confirmation of your request.

Completion of an Ag Day 2011 Registration Form constitutes compliance with the guidelines on the registration web page.  We recommend printing a copy for your reference.

Registration is NOT considered complete until payment is received.  Payment for Ag Day registration is due NO LATER THAN APRIL 1, 2011.   Please include the name of your organization with payment so that we can properly track your registration.

Payment (checks made payable to the University of Delaware) can be mailed to:

Ag Day 2011
ATTN: Registration
104 Townsend Hall
531 South College Avenue
Newark, DE 19716
ATTENTION FOOD VENDORS! Please be sure to see the special section on the registration information page specifically for you.

If you have any questions or problems with registration, please feel free to contact Katy O’Connell kvo@udel.edu or (302) 831-1355.  We look forward to seeing you there!

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Botanic Gardens tour highlights flowering magnolias

March 23, 2011 under CANR News, Events

Magnolias will be featured on the University of Delaware Botanic Gardens tour and at the annual plant sale.

When John Frett leads a guided walk of the University of Delaware Botanic Gardens on March 31, he’s hoping to point out a few early blooming magnolias. More likely, though, he’ll head to the greenhouse to show off magnolias in flower.

Non-native magnolias typically start blooming in Delaware in April while the native varieties wait until May.

With plenty of other March blooms to enjoy — winterhazel, forsythia, hellebores and some dogwoods — why the rush to spot magnolias?

The walk is a spring tradition that highlights plants available at the UD Botanic Gardens Plant Sale. Along with winterhazel, magnolias will be a featured plant of this year’s sale, which is open to the public April 29-30.

Almost everyone loves magnolias. Frett, the director of the UD Botanic Gardens, is no exception. However, he’s reluctant to single out a best-loved cultivar or species. “It’s like picking a favorite child, they’re all fabulous,” says Frett.

Magnolias vary widely. The 80 or so recognized species include trees and shrubs; deciduous plants and evergreens; cold-hardy varieties that do well in Maine and others that flourish in the tropics. About the only thing they have in common are the distinctive, tulip-shaped flowers. And most — but not all — are highly fragrant.

Under Frett’s leadership, the magnolia collection at the UD Botanic Gardens has been expanded to 100 taxa of magnolia, with some 125 magnolias in all.

“The UDBG’s fantastic collection of magnolias includes a nice variety of native and non-native species and cultivars,” says Sue Barton, Cooperative Extension’s ornamental horticulture specialist.

Magnolias are widely scattered throughout the UD gardens but large groupings can be found between Townsend and Worrilow Halls, south of Townsend, and also north of UD’s outdoor pool.

In assembling the collection, Frett looked for a progression of flowering, from the earliest species, in April, to varieties that are still going strong in June. He also included rich and unusual colors, found in the hybrid varieties. In addition to characteristic pink or white petals, magnolia blooms can be light to medium purple, deep purple that is almost red, and yellow.

Barton has one of the yellow varieties in her backyard. “I bought the ‘Elizabeth’ cultivar from the UDBG sale a number of years ago because my older daughter is named Elizabeth,” she explains. “This tree will be covered with yellow flowers in about a month.”

Despite its name, “Elizabeth” isn’t Barton’s favorite backyard magnolia. That distinction goes to the native sweetbay magnolias growing near her patio. “They’re multi-stemmed so they help enclose the patio but you can still view through them so they don’t make it claustrophobic,” she says.

Carrie Murphy, the Extension horticulture agent for New Castle County, says the sweetbay is the top pick for most Delaware gardeners. “Including me,” she adds.

“The sweetbay magnolia is by far one of my favorite plants — it has beautiful late spring and early summer blooms and is lightly fragrant.”

But what Murphy really likes about the sweetbay isn’t apparent at first glance. “I love the underside of the foliage — when the wind blows and rustles the leaves, the silver underside of the leaves becomes visible and it’s absolutely gorgeous,” she says.

Several sweetbays have been added to the Master Garden Demonstration garden at the county Extension office in Newark. At the demo garden, home gardeners often ask for recommendations for small flowering trees and sweetbay nicely fits the bill. It prefers moist soil and some shade and even works well in wet sites. But it’s also adaptable to drier conditions, says Murphy.

Three cultivars of sweetbay will be available at the plant sale: “Mardi Gras,” with a butter-yellow variegated leaf; “Perry Paige,” a new dwarf variety only five to eight feet tall; and “Green Shadow,” a selection that Frett describes as “nearly an evergreen.”

Two other native magnolias will be sold, Magnolia macrophylla “Big Leaf Magnolia,” featuring huge leaves with a tropical feel and Magnolia pyramidata “Pyramid Magnolia,” which is considered rare. Also available will be three hybrids from native species, including two that originated from a cross with the native cucumber tree.

Guided walk

March 31: An hour-and-a-half walk through the UD Botanic Gardens, focusing on plant sale selections. 4 p.m. $5. Call 302-831-2531 or email [kelsch@udel.edu] to register. Maximum 35 people.

UDBG plant sale

Public sale hours are 3-7 p.m., April 29; 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 30. For more information, call 302-831-2531 or go to the UDBG website.

Article by Margo McDonough
Photos by Danielle Quigley

This article can also be read online on UDaily by clicking here.

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Food science program to host College Bowl Competition

March 21, 2011 under CANR News, Events

Since 1985, the Institute of Food Technologists Student Association (IFTSA) College Bowl Competition (CBC) has been quizzing student teams across the nation in the areas of food science and technology.

This year, the University of Delaware will be hosting the 2011 Central Atlantic Area CBC meeting, which will be held during the first weekend of April in Townsend Hall, at the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

Last year, the UD College Bowl team was the Central Atlantic College Bowl champion and went on to take second place at the national level.

There are currently eight recognized IFTSA areas and 55 recognized student chapters. UD, North Carolina State University, University of Maryland and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University are located within the Central Atlantic Area of IFTSA.

During the area meeting, a group of approximately 75 students and professors will partake in various team building exercises and social activities. On Saturday, students will participate in an “ice breaker” event during which time they will also receive a tour of the UD farm facilities.

In addition, students will get the chance to hear a lecture by UD alumna Jennifer McEntire, who currently works for the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT). McEntire will talk to students about what it is like to work in the food industry and how students should prepare themselves for the job seeking process.

For some students, this will be their first contact with industry and a way to get firsthand learning opportunity about how food science and technology are actually used in industry.

The main event of the area meeting, the CBC, will take place on Saturday, April 2, at 1 p.m. in the Townsend Hall Commons.

The winning team from the area meeting will receive a $1,000 travel award in order to compete for the national championship at the IFT Annual Meeting to be held in June in New Orleans.

For more information, contact Hudaa Neeto at [hudaa@udel.edu].

To learn more about food science programs at UD, visit the Department of Animal and Food Sciences website.

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CANR Hosts 2011 Northeastern Corn Improvement Conference

March 21, 2011 under CANR News, Events

The 65th Northeastern Corn Improvement Conference (NEC-029), co-organized by scientists at the University of Delaware, was held February 17 and 18 at the Embassy Suites in Newark, DE.

NEC-029 is one of three regional scientific groups that focus on corn improvement. The group has met annually since 1945, with participants from public and private sectors engaged in research and extension work on corn breeding and genetics, agronomy, plant pathology, and others in the Northeastern U.S. and Eastern Canada. The annual meetings have provided a forum for sharing and discussing research results related to corn improvement and public policy issues affecting corn research.

The NEC-029 conference has directed the focus of several research initiatives including one initiative to combat gray leaf spot, a disease that threatens Northeastern U.S. corn production. As a result, researchers at University of Delaware, Cornell University, Pennsylvania State University, and Virginia Polytechnic and State University have collaborated to develop new gray leaf spot resistant corn lines.

Teclemariam Weldekidan, scientist in the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, has previously served as secretary and president of the NEC-029 and organized this year’s conference. There were 45 attendees at the conference from northeast and mid-west states and Ottawa, Canada. Twenty-one scientific papers on corn improvement were presented by invited and volunteered speakers, including graduate students. Attendees were thrilled with all aspects of this year’s conference. Several noted the meeting as the best in recent history in terms of the attendance, agenda, and venue.

Blake Meyers, the Edward F. and Elizabeth Goodman Rosenberg Professor and Chairperson of the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, opened the meeting with remarks about UD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources structure, mission, and philosophy and its academic, research, and cooperative extension programs. Meyers discussed the value of agriculture in Delaware and contributions from UD’s corn breeding program including a productive UD-Pioneer Hi-Bred (a DuPont company) collaboration that led to the identification of a gene for corn disease resistance. This was followed by sessions on a range of topics including breeding and genetics, corn grain and silage composition management, new product development, crop management/ protection, and disease and insect resistance.

A special report was presented by Erick Erickson, the special assistant for planning and evaluation for the U.S. Grains Council, who discussed “World and U.S. Corn Supply and Demand Outlook.” Erickson reported the USDA’s long term projection for U.S. corn area planted to rise from 86.5 to 92 million acres, yields to climb from 164.7 to 180 bushels per acre, production to rise from 13.1 to 15.3 billion bushels, and ethanol use to rise from 4.57 to 5.53 billion bushels by the year 2020.

The new biotechnology events combined with advanced breeding and crop production techniques may push U.S. corn yields to more than 200 bushels per acre. Since the world must double food production while using less water and land, this requires progress in increasing genetic potential, increasing water use efficiency, and reducing losses due to disease and pests and post-harvest. 

For more information on Weldekidan’s work with corn, visit [http://www.udel.edu/PR/UDaily/2007/aug/corn080906.html].

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April 15, 16: Annual UD push lawnmower tune-up

March 11, 2011 under CANR News, Events

Looking to save a little money on your lawn care in these tight financial times? The University of Delaware’s Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity for agriculture, the Society of Automotive Engineers Club and the Engineering Technology Club are once again offering a push lawn mower tune-up service on Friday, April 15 ,and Saturday, April 16, rain or shine.

Since 2000, this annual event has serviced more than 5,000 push mowers.

The tune-up — provided by trained students and alumni members of the clubs — includes an oil change, spark plug replacement, air filter check and cleaning, blade sharpening, and power washing. Service performed is tune-up only; no repairs or riding mowers are accepted.

The cost of the tune-up is $38. Payment in the form of cash or check may be made at drop off.

Drop off times are from 2 to 8 p.m. on Friday, April 15, and from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 16. Customers can pick up their mowers on Saturday from 1 to 6 p.m. for the first 300 mowers taken on Friday, or on Sunday, April 17, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. for the remaining mowers.

All mowers must be picked up by 2 p.m. on Sunday. Any mowers not picked up by Sunday will be charged a storage fee.

Lawnmowers (no riding mowers) may be dropped off and picked up in the parking lot behind Worrilow and Townsend halls on UD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources campus at 531 S. College Ave., just north of the Fred Rust Ice Arena. Look for signs for the tune-up.

For more information, email [mcarunch@udel.edu] or call the Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity at 302-837-3379.

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Learn heart-smart eating at Cooperative Extension program

March 11, 2011 under CANR News, Cooperative Extension, Events

Cardiovascular disease and stroke will cost the United States an estimated $503.2 billion in 2010, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). That figure includes both health care costs and lost productivity due to death and disease.

The AHA says many of these cases could have been prevented, citing risk factors that include obesity, too little exercise and poor diet.

“Scientific evidence indicates that if you eat right, you may reduce your risk of many chronic diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and certain cancers,” says Kathleen Splane, a University of Delaware Cooperative Extension educator. “But limited time, limited money and limited knowledge can get in the way of healthy eating.”

Splane and Extension colleague Cheryl Bush are helping Delawareans combat these impediments to nutritious eating with the Eat Smart for a Healthy Heart program. The next session begins Monday, May 2, in Newark and will be led by Bush, who is a registered dietician.

The three-part program includes education, cooking demonstrations and samplings of healthy foods. The first class focuses on desserts, the second on main dishes and the final class on side dishes. The program also includes basic information about heart disease, including risk factors, and other measures, such as exercise, that can impact cardiovascular health.

Eat Smart for a Healthy Heart features recipes with little or no saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol; little salt; low-fat sources of protein; and plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

“We teach that there are no ‘bad foods,’ that there are many creative ways to modify beloved old recipes into new, healthy favorites,” says Splane. “Class participants learn ways to reduce the salt and fat without sacrificing the taste.”

Splane has been cooking a heart healthy diet for her own family for more than a decade. Through plenty of research and trial and error, she has discovered how to present healthier versions of familiar foods without sacrificing taste.

Eat Smart for a Healthy Heart will be offered on Mondays, May 2, 9 and 16, from 10 a.m. to noon, at the New Castle County Cooperative Extension Office, 461 Wyoming Rd., Newark. The series costs $45 and is limited to the first 30 registrants. All child care providers who attend are entitled to receive continuing education credits. To register or for more information, call 302-831-1327.

This post is also available online on UDaily by clicking here.

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Blake Meyers appointed Rosenberg Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences

December 1, 2010 under CANR News, Events

Blake C. Meyers, a faculty member in the University of Delaware’s Department of Plant and Soil Sciences since 2002, has been named the Edward F. and Elizabeth Goodman Rosenberg Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences, UD Provost Tom Apple has announced.

“Named professorships honor faculty members who have achieved distinction in their disciplines, both on this campus and in the greater world of academia,” Apple said. “It is a pleasure to add Dr. Meyers’ name to this select and important group of UD faculty.”

Meyers, who is currently serving as the chairperson of the department, also holds a joint appointment in the Department of Computer and Information Sciences.

He will present his inaugural lecture as Edward F. and Elizabeth Goodman Rosenberg Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences at 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 7, in Room 102 of the Delaware Biotechnology Institute. His topic will be “Plant Genomes and Their RNA Products: Insights from Advances in DNA Sequencing.” Those planning to attend are asked to RSVP by calling (302) 831-2502.

The full article with photo can be viewed online on UDaily by clicking here.

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