University’s UDairy Creamery dishes out winter delights

January 10, 2013 under CANR News

Although ice cream may not be the first thing on everyone’s mind throughout these cold winter months, things do not slow down at the University of Delaware’s UDairy Creamery, where fresh ice cream is made daily.

Of the limited-edition flavors that were released for the holiday season, some are still being offered. Among them are amaretto cookie, peppermint hot chocolate and the best-selling holiday flavor, peppermint bark.

This year, too, the creamery is developing winter flavors – something it has never done before.

UDairy Creamery ice creamAccording to Melinda Litvinas, UDairy Creamery manager, they are working to create new flavors that will be released this month, some of which will remind us of warmer days. Although most of the soon-to-be-released flavors are still under wraps, one promised delight is coconut.

Another premier event for the creamery is the development of a new, intriguing flavor to be created in honor of the 90th anniversary of UD’s study abroad programs. Details are being kept quiet until the flavor has been finalized.

For those looking to keep warm, UDairy Creamery also offers a nice variety of hot drinks. While the specialty is homemade hot chocolate with homemade whipped cream, the creamery also provides tea, various flavors of coffee and cappuccino.

The creamery is hoping to attract visitors during this season’s sporting events, and is serving at all men’s and women’s home basketball games. The Fred Rust Ice Arena is also providing free UDairy Creamery ice cream during Family Fun Weekends being held Jan. 26 and Feb. 17.

Winter hours

The winter hours are very agreeable to the season with the UDairy Creamery open until 7 p.m. every night, and opening at 9 a.m. Monday through Friday and at 11 a.m. on weekends.

For those who have a craving for delicious ice cream, but find the creamery – located off South College Avenue near UD’s Townsend Hall — a little out of the way, limited flavors of ice cream are sold at the University of Delaware’s Barnes and Noble Bookstore and at Marriott’s Courtyard Newark-University of Delaware.

The ice cream continues to be sold in all the markets on campus, including Rodney, Harrington and the POD on the Laird Campus.

Article by Samantha Walsh

Photo by Danielle Quigley

This article can also be viewed on UDaily.

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Native Gifts for the Holidays

December 15, 2011 under CANR News, Cooperative Extension

Gift certificates for UDairy Creamery ice cream make a great holiday treat.

The holiday season is right around the corner. Some folks wrapped up their shopping on Black Friday but plenty haven’t finished the task – and some haven’t even started.

No worries. We’ve rounded up some great gift ideas. Best yet, these gifts have a uniquely Delaware focus. Some choices – like landscape design classes – are tailor-made for outdoorsy types. Others gifts – like Delaware wool blankets — work equally well for couch potatoes who just gaze at the landscape from their windows.

From spices to vines 

A few years ago, New Castle County Master Gardeners began offering winter workshops in addition to their regular fall and spring classes. “The response was overwhelming,” says Carrie Murphy, the University of Delaware Cooperative Extension horticultural agent for New Castle County. “January and February aren’t good for gardening but they’re perfect for learning new ways to garden and planning for the season ahead.”

Winter workshop topics include vines and espaliers, downsizing your garden, and the origin of cooking spices. For the complete list, go to this website.

To purchase a gift certificate for a Master Garden workshop, call 302-831-COOP.

Keep warm with Delaware wool

UD’s flock of Dorset ewes get sheared every spring before going out to summer pasture. Previously, their wool was sold at a regional auction to wool processors. Then farm superintendent Scott Hopkins and animal science professor Lesa Griffiths put their heads together and, soon after, Blue Hen Blankets and Yarn was born. Now, after the sheep are sheared, the wool is sent to a Canadian mill to create cozy blankets in two styles — a lap throw and a queen-size version.

The blankets have plenty of heft — each lap throw requires four pounds of wool and the queen-sized contain 12 pounds.  The lap size is $100 and queen-size $175. Buy them at the UDairy Creamery on UD’s South Campus. For creamery location and hours, see the website.

A gift that lasts all year

Surfing at Indian River Inlet and swimming at Fenwick Island. Hiking at Alapocas Run and biking at White Clay Creek. Pond fishing at Killens Pond and surf fishing at Cape Henlopen. Give them an annual pass to Delaware’s state parks, where they can enjoy their favorite outdoor activity — or try something new.

Annual passes range in price from $12 for a senior citizen to $54 for an of-state resident. For more info, or to buy a pass online, go to the state parks website.

UD profs and other experts at Longwood

Don’t let “Tips for Turf Diagnosis: Insect and Disease Management” scare you. Sure, Longwood Gardens’ continuing education program has serious classes for pros. But there’s also “beginning bonsai” and “orchids for beginners.” Your gift recipient doesn’t even have to be a gardener — birding, photography, art and flower arranging classes also are offered.

UD prof Sue Barton teaches the fundamentals of sustainable landscape design in a five-session class; UD adjunct instructor Jon Cox presents the secrets to photographing water in an all-day session. For the full schedule of classes go to the Longwood website and click on “education.”

Longwood gift cards can be purchased on Longwood’s website or at the Kennett Square, Pa., gardens.

Give ‘em Delaware River Mud

Mud pie ice cream, that is.

Delaware River Mud Pie is the most popular flavor at the UDairy Creamery, according to manager Melinda Litvinas. This ice cream pairs vanilla and chocolate cookie with swirls of fudge.

Plus, the creamery offers seasonal selections, including peppermint bark, eggnog, gingerbread and peppermint hot chocolate. Gift certificates are available in $5 denominations, perfect for stocking stuffers.

You may want to pick up All Nighter for yourself. This concoction of coffee ice cream and cookie dough chunks, crushed cookies and fudge swirl won a recent flavor creation contest. It was concocted by UD senior Kate Maloney. According to her contest entry, “Every college student has to pull an all-nighter at some point… [this ice cream] gives you the sugar rush you need to survive a 24-hour cram session.”

All Nighter could be just thing for assembling toys late on Christmas Eve, too.

The UDairy Creamery is located behind Townsend Hall on the Newark campus. The creamery closes on Dec. 23 at 5 p.m. (and re-opens Jan. 3). For more information, see the UDairy Creamery website.

Article by Margo McDonough

Photo by Danielle Quigley

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Final Flavors

October 17, 2011 under CANR News, Events

UD ice cream enthusiasts have voted and “Blue Hen Tracks” and “All Nighter” are the two finalists in UDairy Creamery’s Blue Hen Signature Ice Cream Contest.

Members of the UD community will have several opportunities to vote for their favorite, with the winning entry (both flavor and person) to be announced at Homecoming festivities. The winning flavor will be featured at the UDairy Creamery store and at Creamery concessions at Delaware Stadium on Homecoming weekend.

Taste tests and final voting will take place:

Thursday, Oct. 20: 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at both the UD Bookstore and Perkins Student Center; and

Thursday, Oct. 27:  5-7:30 p.m., at select dining hall locations in conjunction with Local Garden Harvest Dinners.

In addition, the UDairy Creamery team will be visiting a variety of UD locations throughout main campus and satellite locations throughout the state. For additional dates, times, and locations, be sure to follow the Creamery on Facebook and Twitter.

Blue Hen Tracks is vanilla ice cream with blue-shelled chocolate candy and a peanut butter swirl. The entry submission said: “The Blue Hen name association and color-combo is obvious. The ice cream mixture is simple and uncomplicated, which would stand the test of time. Anything too fancy or too complicated with lots of ingredients is trendy, but not always appealing to the largest group of consumers. I can already taste it — yum!”

All Nighter is coffee ice cream with cookie dough chunks, crushed chocolate sandwich cookies and a fudge swirl. This entry submission said, “Every college student has to pull an all nighter at some point in their college career. It can be sweeter with this delectable ice cream flavor. Designed to give you the sugar rush you need to survive a 24-hour cram session.”

Two of the eight final flavors that didn’t make the finals are currently being sold for a limited time at the Creamery store — UDe Leche and First State Cobbler. “We had left over ice cream from the taste tests,” said creamery manager, Melinda Litvinas, “and these two flavors were ones that we thought really stood up to our standards for flavors. We contacted the people who submitted the ideas, and they were happy to have their ice cream available for a limited time.”

UDe Leche — caramel ice cream with crushed vanilla cookies and a caramel swirl — was submitted by Michelle Pusey, a master’s student in the College of Arts and Sciences.  Pusey’s entry said, “This flavor would be the perfect official ‘Blue Hen’ flavor of the UDairy Creamery. The ice cream is crafted from UD milk from UD cows at UD! The simplicity of the flavor exemplifies the quality ingredients produced right here by the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Just as the UDairy Creamery has fostered fellowship among the entire University, ‘UDe Leche’ will further unite the Blue Hen community.”

First State Cobbler — peach flavored ice cream with a cobbler crumble and blueberry swirl — was submitted by Anette Karlsson, professor and chair of mechanical engineering.  According to the entry, “Peach and blueberry capture the true flavor of the Blue Hen: It is golden and blue, and it represents some of the greatest produce that is grown in the state of Delaware. And who does not like a fruit cobbler?”

Visit the UDairy Creamery website for more information.

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Ice Cream Taste Tests

October 3, 2011 under CANR News, Events

Free ice cream taste tests featuring the finalists in the UDairy Creamery’s Blue Hen Flavor Contest will take place over the next few weeks, with the first scheduled Thursday, Oct. 6, on The Green.

UDairy Creamery staff combed through the nearly 300 entries submitted by staff, students, alumni, parents and UD friends. Eight flavor entries were selected and those flavors are currently in development at the creamery. The eight finalists are being notified.

In the first week, a taste test of the chosen eight entries will occur.  Students who participate will be asked to vote for their favorite flavor and after tallying the results, the competition will be narrowed down to four finalists.

The next week, more taste tests and voting will lead to two finalists.

Votes will be tallied and the winning flavor will be announced during Homecoming Weekend. Prizes will be awarded to the winner and one randomly selected participant.

The taste test schedule is as follows, with all events running from at least 11 a.m.-1p.m:

• Thursday, Oct. 6 — The Green, near Gore Hall

• Thursday, Oct. 13 — Trabant University Center

• Thursday, Oct. 20 — UD Barnes and Noble Bookstore and Perkins Student Center

Additional locations University-wide may be added during the month.  Follow@UDairyCreamery on Twitter or on Facebook for dates, times, and location announcements.

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Help create UDairy Creamery’s signature flavor

September 12, 2011 under CANR News

The UDairy Creamery has announced its “Blue Hen Flavor Contest,” a University-wide competition to create a signature ice cream flavor for the University of Delaware.  Students, faculty, staff and alumni are encouraged to participate.

The rules are simple — come up with a flavor that you think should be UD’s signature flavor and tell UDairy Creamery what it is and why it deserves to win. Participants are encouraged to be creative and to think outside the box.

There are several ways to enter. If you pre-ordered textbooks from the UD Barnes and Noble Bookstore, you already have a form in your bookstore packet, along with a coupon for $1 off of any ice cream purchase at the UDairy Creamery store, located on south campus next to the ice arenas.  Just drop off the entry form at the creamery.

Blank entry forms are also available at the creamery, and entries are being accepted online through this link.

Creamery staff will choose eight finalists, and then create all eight of the chosen flavors. In the first week, taste tests of the chosen eight entries will occur at various locations across the campus. You may only vote one time per taste testing round.

Students who participate will be asked to vote for their favorite flavor and after tallying the results, the competition will be narrowed down to four finalists. The next week, more taste tests and voting will lead to two finalists.

From there, the ultimate taste test and voting will determine the winning flavor, which will be announced at the Homecoming football game on Nov. 12.

The UDairy Creamery will award prizes to the creator of the winning flavor and to one randomly chosen person who votes during the competition.  Winners will be contacted via email.

Check the UDairy Creamery’s Facebook page and website frequently for announcements about the times and locations of the taste tests, and then show up and be ready for great ice cream innovations.

Important dates

Sept. 21 – Entries close

Oct 3 – Eight finalists are announced

Oct. 6 – First round of taste tests (8 choices)

Oct. 13 – Second round of taste tests (4 choices)

Oct. 20 – Third and final round of taste tests (2 choices)

Nov. 12 (Homecoming) – Winner is announced. The winning flavor will be available for purchase at the football game.

The UDairy Creamery, established in 2008, produces premium ice cream made with the milk from the cows on the farm at the University of Delaware College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Founded on science, sustainability and entrepreneurship, the Creamery encourages discovery learning, with University students involved in every aspect of making and selling ice cream “from the cow to the cone.”

Posted on UDaily here.

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Hurricane Irene: UDairy Creamery

August 26, 2011 under CANR News, Events

The UDairy Creamery will be CLOSED on Saturday, Sunday and possibly Monday due to Hurricane Irene. Please visit the creamery website and Facebook page for more information.

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UDairy Creamery partners with Center for Disabilities Studies

August 8, 2011 under CANR News

Sophie DeMesse, center, with Geoffrey Steggell and William Edwards

For Geoffrey Steggell and William Edwards, the UDairy Creameryis a great place to hone the skills that they’ve learned at the University of Delaware’s Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS).

UDairy Creamery has partnered with CDS to hire individuals with disabilities to work in the store through the center’s Transition, Education and Employment Model (TEEM) Employment Services program.

TEEM helps individuals with disabilities gain greater independence and involvement in the community. TEEM’s Employment Services program teach employment skills, social awareness, effective communication and self-advocacy.

Although originally hired to work in the UDaily Creamery production area making ice cream, Steggell and Edwards also operate the cash register and take customer orders. They receive on-the-job coaching from CDS employment specialist Sophie DeMesse, who helps them communicate and problem solve.

DeMesse is a 2010 graduate of UD’s College of Education and Human Development who has a degree in human services with a minor in disabilities studies. As an employment specialist for TEEM Employment Services, she guides individuals with disabilities through the entire process of employment, helping them to obtain and maintain jobs in the community.

Steggell, a 22-year-old graduate of Newark High School, says he loves working at the UDairy Creamery. His favorite aspect of the job is working at the cash register, but he also enjoys making ice cream. He works with the food science team to create various flavors, including the new Cinnamon Toast Crunchie.

Edwards, a 21-year-old graduate of Hodgson Vocational Technical High School, also enjoys his time at the UDairy Creamery, where his favorite part of the job is making ice cream. He takes part and enjoys all aspects of making ice cream and helping to operate the creamery.

As employees of the UDairy Creamery, Steggell and Edwards learn how to work as members of a team, how to provide good customer support and—most importantly—how to make great ice cream. But they aren’t the only ones who benefit from the partnership between UDairy Creamery and CDS.

UDairy Creamery manager Melinda Litvinas says that employees can learn how to interact more effectively with individuals with disabilities as members of the workforce and community. As the program has continued, Litvinas says that she has “observed a positive response to Geoffrey and William’s work from both the creamery employees and the public.”

DeMesse agrees that the entire community benefits from this and other TEEM Employment Services partnerships because employing people with disabilities opens the eyes of customers and other employees to new situations and possibilities. “There are many challenges and many barriers to getting a person a job, but it’s so rewarding when the individual can work independently, loves the job and succeeds in doing just as well as anyone else,” she says.

CDS actively reaches out to prospective employers like the creamery who are open to employing individuals with disabilities. “We are so grateful for the openness that many employers at UD have demonstrated by creating opportunities for individuals with disabilities,” says Brian Freedman, director of the TEEM unit.

Since starting work at the UDairy Creamery, Steggell and Edwards have both been accepted into TEEM’s new Career and Life Studies Certificate (CLSC) program. This program is designed for individuals who want to continue their education after high school but require additional assistance. The two-year CLSC program, which leads to a certificate, is tailored to the needs of the individual and provides coaching and peer mentoring for the participants. It gives young adults like Steggell and Edwards more options for their future.

For more information about the UDairy Creamery and special promotions, “like” UDairy Creamery on Facebook or visit the creamery website.

Information about the Center for Disabilities Studies is available at the center’s website.

Article by Jenna Byers

Photos by Danielle Quigley

This article was originally posted online on UDaily.

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Ice cream at new bookstore

July 22, 2011 under CANR News

Just when you thought the new University of Delaware Bookstore couldn’t get any sweeter, it will. Not only is the location optimal for student traffic, the new bookstore — operated by Barnes & Noble — will also be selling pints of UDairy Creamery ice cream in the Blue Hen Café, located right inside the building’s Main Street entrance.

“We are very excited to be selling UDairy ice cream,” said Jennifer Galt, bookstore manager. “It’s a natural partnership and we look forward to hosting many events together.”

UD and Barnes & Noble opened ground for construction of the new UD Bookstore on Aug. 30, 2010. The new bookstore will be located at 83 E. Main St., and is on schedule to open on Aug. 1, with a grand opening event on Sept. 1.

Since 2002, UD has partnered with Barnes & Noble and last year signed a long-term contract extension to continue the collaboration. The UDairy Creamery is just one of many partners involved in the new bookstore, which will also include an Apple Authorized Campus Store and a Starbucks.

“This is a win-win-win opportunity,” said David Brond, vice president for communications and marketing. “The bookstore can promote the products of a local, student-run source, the UDairy Creamery can introduce its premium ice cream to the downtown Newark community, and the UD community can enjoy greater access to the official ice cream of the University of Delaware.”

Beginning in fall 2011, UDairy Creamery ice cream will also be available at all of the on-campus markets. The Rodney and Harrington markets will carry pints, while the new Provisions on Demand (POD) will have scoops, milkshakes and pints available.

The UDairy Creamery, established in 2008, produces premium ice cream made with milk from the cows on the farm at the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Founded on science, sustainability and entrepreneurship, the creamery encourages discovery learning, with UD students involved in every aspect of making and selling ice cream “from the cow to the cone.”

This summer, the UDairy Creamery is open Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, visit the UDairy Creamery website. And, don’t forget to “like” UDairy Creamery on Facebook for information on upcoming events and special promotions.

Article by Rachael Dubinsky

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Fresh milk

July 20, 2011 under CANR News

For the first time, milk produced by the dairy herd on the University of Delaware campus is being distributed on campus.

The distribution comes thanks to a partnership between the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) and Hy-Point Dairy of Wilmington, Del., which is the sole distributor of UD-produced milk.

Since June, all of the milk produced by the University’s 100-head dairy herd has been sent to Hy-Point and, for the first time, the milk produced on campus has been distributed back to the University community.

Hy-Point Dairy is owned by Jay Meany, a 1981 graduate of CANR, and has long been an established partner in UD’s dairy initiatives.  The Meany family includes several UD alumni, including not only Jay Meany but also Jessica Meany, a 2007 CANR graduate, and Dan Meany, a 2009 CANR graduate.

“We all take pride in our connection with UD, both as alumni and business partners,” said Dan Meany, who was also a member of the original business plan team for the UDairy Creamery in 2008. “Hy-Point continues to be dedicated to the development, establishment and overall progress of dairy initiatives at the University.”

From assisting with the initial business plan to providing countless hours of support and advice on planning and implementation efforts, the Meany family and others at Hy-Point have been instrumental in the overall success of the UDairy Creamery.

The milk distributed by Hy-Point will be sold in all of the on-campus markets and provided in the dining halls. And it will continue to be used for UDairy ice cream.

“We are fully-committed to local purchasing when possible and this new agreement with UD and Hy-Point will bring important sustainable efforts full-circle,” said Robin Moore, director of operations for dining services.

The UD dairy, located on the 350-acre CANR complex in Newark, not only provides milk for the University but also serves as a living laboratory for undergraduate and graduate students.

“Our college is very happy to enter into this partnership with Hy-Point, a local business that has been extremely supportive to us, especially in our efforts to start the UDairy Creamery,” said Tom Sims, deputy dean of CANR and the T.A. Baker Professor of Soil and Environmental Chemistry. “Our new cooperation with Hy-Point will allow students, faculty and staff at UD to enjoy locally-produced milk from our dairy every day. This is consistent with our college’s efforts to not only teach but demonstrate the principles of agricultural sustainability to our students.”

Read the full article on UDaily by clicking here.

To learn more about CANR’s dairy research program, visit the website.

Learn more about the UDairy Creamery at this website.

Article by Rachael Dubinsky

Photo by Danielle Quigley

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A UDairy farewell

June 13, 2011 under CANR News

Graduation day was a bittersweet ending for Rachael Dubinsky and Amanda Prudente. The day marked a great milestone in their academic careers, but also meant that their time as student managers at the UDairy Creamery was coming to a close.

Both Dubinsky and Prudente played a pivotal role in the plans for and development of the creamery. Now, as graduates of the University of Delaware College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR), they have positions that fall directly in line with what they learned as student managers.

Dubinsky, who served as the creamery’s communications manager, graduated with a dual degree in agriculture and natural resources and interpersonal communication, with minors in food science and food and agribusiness marketing and management. In her time at UD, she was a member of the UD Color Guard, the Food Science Club, Sigma Alpha (the professional agriculture sorority), and gave tours to prospective students and families as an Ag Ambassador.

In her role as the communications manager, Dubinsky was responsible for promoting the creamery to the University and Newark community, as well as developing marketing plans for the future of the business.

Using her skills and knowledge in both agriculture and communications to educate others about the “cow to cone” process, Dubinsky stated, “Not only was it exciting to see this project come to fruition but by being on the management team, I really do feel as though I have left my mark here at UD”.

Dubinsky is staying on at CANR as the special assistant to the deputy dean. In this position, she will continue to work on public relations and advertising ventures for the creamery.

Prudente served as the dairy and food science manager for the creamery and is now pursuing a career as a flavor technician at David Michael and Co. in Philadelphia. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in food science, with minors in chemistry and food and agribusiness marketing and management. In addition, she served as the vice president of the Food Science Club, was a member of the Delaware Repertory Dance Company and was an Ag Ambassador.

As the dairy and food science manager, Prudente was responsible for securing health permits for events and ordering supplies for the store. Prudente was integral in making the creamery’s first batch of ice cream with the new equipment and also used her food science knowledge to create herb-themed ice cream toppings for the annual “Spring Fling” event in March, which celebrates the Garden for the Community, a partnership between the CANR and the Food Bank of Delaware. Prudente’s unique background in both food science and business management has prepared her for a successful career in the flavor industry.

She said, “I really think this position helped merge both my science and business interests.  Ultimately, I was able to apply the things I learned in the classroom to a real world business setting.”

The creamery had many milestones this past year, including the construction of the storefront and the ribbon cutting ceremony on Ag Day. Dubinsky and Prudente were able to use their internship experience to hone in on their individual strengths and ultimately play an integral role in the development and success of the creamery.

To learn more about the creamery student managers, visit the UDairy Creamery website.

This summer, the creamery is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. And, don’t forget to “like” UDairy Creamery on Facebook for information on upcoming events and special promotions.

This article can also be viewed online on UDaily.

Article by Jenna Byers

Photo by Danielle Quigley

 


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