UD alum writes ice cream cookbook featuring UDairy Creamery

January 29, 2014 under CANR News

UD Alum Lindsay Clendaniel features UDairy Creamery in CookbookMost adventures don’t lead to writing a cookbook – particularly one about ice cream – but that is where University of Delaware alumna Lindsay Clendaniel was headed all along when she started a Scoop Adventures blog in 2009 to chronicle her experiences with unique and interesting flavors and recipes.

The blog ultimately led to a publisher approaching her to write a cookbook on the subject and Clendaniel, a 2003 UD graduate, jumped at the opportunity.

The cookbook, titled Scoop Adventures: The Best Ice Cream of the 50 States, is due out on March 25 and features ice cream recipes from all 50 states as well as 30 of Clendaniel’s own personal recipes. Chapters are divided up regionally, from the “Sugary Southeast” to “The Mountains of Milk and Cream.”

Clendaniel took six months to write the book, in which she found and whipped up 12 to 16 recipes per week. “The book is full of recipes that I would consider pretty unique and creative,” said Clendaniel. “There is nothing wrong with the run of the mill chocolate, vanilla and strawberry when it’s done right, but I like coming up with pretty creative flavors.”

Clendaniel said she sought out contributors, looking for ice cream vendors that used good ingredients and had a good philosophy about ice cream, as well as that creative knack for flavor.

When it came time to pick an ice cream contributor for Delaware, Clendaniel looked no further than her alma mater. “The UDairy Creamery didn’t start until after I graduated but, of course, since I’m so in to ice cream, I was super excited to hear that they were actually starting a creamery on campus. As soon as I got this book opportunity one of the first things I did was contact the University of Delaware.”

For the book, Clendaniel said the UDairy Creamery contributed its recipe for the flavor known as “Junk in the Tree Trunk,” which consists of maple, a caramel swirl, pecan and praline pieces. She noted that she is a big fan of the UDairy Creamery flavors “Holy Fluffernutter!” and “Katie’s Bagged Lunch,” as well.

Not surprisingly, Clendaniel’s adventures opened her eyes to some interesting flavors of ice cream, such as basil. “I heard of restaurants making basil ice cream and it turns out that the anise kind of quality actually does well with the ice cream — and when you pair it with things like lemon and strawberry, it’s really good.”

Clendaniel, who works as a psychologist, said that ice cream and her blog are a special interest of hers and that it is “nice to have an interest that is truly different from my work. Outside of work, I love food, and I love sweet things, so ice cream was just a good thing to find.”

Having dealt with ice cream for so long and tasted so many flavors over the years, it is also no surprise that Clendaniel has trouble picking a favorite.

“I love fresh fruit flavors. I think that making sorbets is one of the best things to do with fresh fruit other than eat it,” she said, adding, “This is always the hardest question. I love chocolate flavors, too — some of the chocolate flavors in the book that I like are chocolate coconut macadamia nut. Those are just kind of playing with chocolate, which is one of my favorite things to do, too.”

Scoop Adventures: The Best Ice Cream of the 50 States is available for pre-order on-line at Barnes and Noble.

Those interested can also check out Clendaniel’s Scoop Adventures Blog.

Article by Adam Thomas

Photo by Danielle Quigley

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New UDairy Creamery truck serves ice cream at Delaware State Fair

July 24, 2013 under CANR News

Moo Mobile will be at the Delaware State FairThe UDairy Creamery will be serving ice cream at the Delaware State Fair in Harrington, which opened Thursday, July 18, and will continue through Saturday, July 27.

The “Moo Mobile,” UDairy Creamery’s new ice cream truck — decorated in cow spots and ears and equipped with a speaker that plays the UD alma mater and fight song — will be parked in Harrington all week.

UDairy Creamery ice cream will be available in two locations throughout the fair. The truck will be serving up sweet treats every day on Halloway Street from 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Additionally, fairgoers can get UDairy Creamery ice cream at a booth in the Delaware Building every day from noon-8 p.m.

The new truck is the only University-funded ice cream truck in the nation. A collaboration between the Alfred Lerner College of Business and Economics and the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR), the truck serves as an example of UD’s dedication to the state’s agricultural heritage and values.

“The Moo Mobile is allowing the creamery to attend larger events such as the State Fair and Coast Day with the capability of serving larger quantities of ice cream and offering more flavor options,” said Melinda Litvinas, UDairy Creamery manager.

Additionally, the UDairy Creamery operations give prospective future Blue Hens a glimpse of the hands-on learning opportunities available at UD.

“It’s a great opportunity for our UD student employees to learn how to operate a mobile facility, just another facet of entrepreneurship,” said Litvinas. “During the fair, we also staff Future Farmers of America volunteers from across the state, furthering our mission to teach students and support Delaware agriculture programs.”

The University encourages State Fair attendees to join the conversation about the unique ice cream truck –and all things UD and State Fair related — using the hashtag #StateFairUD.

For more information on UD at the Delaware State Fair, click here.

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University’s UDairy Creamery is a ‘cow to cone’ operation

June 18, 2013 under CANR News

The 100-plus Holstein dairy cows at the University of Delaware’s Newark Farm perform a very important function – they provide hands-on experiences and research opportunities for undergrad and grad students. Research options run the gamut, as the dairy nutrition research program is closely linked with studies on silage and forage production.

But some would argue that these Holsteins serve an even greater good – supplying the first and most important ingredient in UDairy Creamery ice cream.

UDairy Creamery cow to coneEstablished in 2008, the UDairy Creamery produces premium ice cream in flavors such as “All Nighter” (coffee ice cream with cookie dough chunks, crushed chocolate sandwich cookies and a fudge swirl) and “Blue Hen Tracks” (vanilla ice cream with peanut butter cups, chocolate swirls and sprinkles).

“UD’s dairy cows provide the milk needed for 3,000 gallons of ice cream base each month,” says creamery manager Melinda Litvinas.

The process of getting that milk starts at 4:30 a.m. each morning, when first milking begins. It takes three hours to milk the cows and pump the milk into a cooling tank chilled to 38 degrees. Second milking starts at 3:30 p.m. and runs until 6:30 p.m. By the end of each day, the UD Dairy has produced 8,000 pounds of milk, according to dairy manager Richard Morris.

The portion of milk that’s earmarked for the creamery is delivered to Cumberland Dairy, in Bridgeton, N.J., where it’s homogenized and pasteurized, then made into ice cream base. The rest of the milk is picked up every two days by Hy-Point Dairy, which homogenizes and pasteurizes it for use in UD dining halls, as well as some New Castle County public school cafeterias. The remaining milk is sold to a dairy cooperative.

Although Cumberland makes the creamery’s ice cream base, the actual ice cream is made on site at UD by student employees, one small batch at a time. All those small batches add up. During peak season, the creamery produces almost eight tons of ice cream each week.

On a recent morning, Liz Abraham, an employee who just graduated from UD, was saying her teary-eyed goodbyes to Litvinas as rising sophomore Jason Morris made up a batch of “Delaware River Mud Pie.”

Morris has been working at the creamery since high school but he’s been around UD’s dairy cows all his life – he’s Richard Morris’ son. “When I was little, I lived on a house on the UD Farm,” he says. “I’m majoring in agribusiness now, and I’m learning a lot at the creamery.”

As he deftly mixes crushed cookies and fudge into vanilla ice cream, without so much as a splotch of chocolate splattering his apron, it’s clear that Morris has picked up the ins and outs of ice cream making.

“When I first started working here, I would be covered in fudge or caramel or marshmallow fluff after making a batch,” he says.

But he and the other student employees are learning more than just how to stay neat while working with humongous vats of fudge. Litvinas hires three interns each academic year to work as student managers. Together these managers and their 30 student employees develop and implement the creamery’s business plans.

They arrange for the sale of UDairy ice cream in bulk and at campus events. They order chocolate sandwich cookies and all the other mix-in ingredients, oversee special events, think up contests and other promotions. And best of all, experiment to come up with new ice cream flavors.

“The students have a lot of freedom to craft new ice cream flavors and test them out,” says Litvinas.

Currently, the most popular flavor is “Delaware River Mud Pie,” which features vanilla and chocolate cookie ice cream with fudge swirls. The No. 2 flavor is “1923,” a special flavor commemorating UD’s 90 years of study abroad. “1923” starts with French vanilla (France was the first destination for UD study abroad), complemented by bittersweet chocolate chunks and salted caramel swirls.

Creamery ice cream is sold by the scoop or carton at the storefront location on South College Avenue, as well as by the pint at the UD Barnes and Noble Bookstore and the Marriott Courtyard hotel on campus. And now it is available from an ice cream truck that will periodically visit UD’s Lewes and Georgetown campuses, as well as special events, including the Delaware State Fair.

Or, you could get your ice cream fix by going back to school. A rotating selection of creamery flavors is available in UD’s dining halls. Each week during the school year, students on the meal plan gobble up more than 1,000 pounds of ice cream.

The UDairy Creamery is located on the campus of UD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, 535 S. College Ave. in Newark. Summer hours are 9 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday-Friday; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. on weekends. For more information, see the website.

Article by Margo McDonough

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College partnership brings ice cream truck to UD

June 12, 2013 under CANR News

The UDairy Creamery has now been equipped with an ice cream truckThanks to a partnership between the University of Delaware’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) and the Alfred Lerner College of Business and Economics, the UDairy Creamery will now be equipped with an ice cream truck, allowing for students from UD to get hands-on experience with a real-world business.

The UDairy Creamery ice cream truck will make its debut on Friday, June 14, with staff members handing out free ice cream at the UD Farmers Market being held in Mentors’ Circle from 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

In addition to the farmers market, the ice cream truck will also be at the Old Fashioned Ice Cream Festival at Rockwood Park in Wilmington on Saturday, June 29, and Sunday, June 30, and at the Delaware State Fair in Harrington, which starts on Thursday, July 18.

The truck is decked out with assorted black and white cow and ice cream cone spots, cow ears that can be placed below the side view mirrors and a speaker to play the UD alma mater and fight song, among other UD-themed music.

The truck will serve parts of UD’s main campus as well as be able to bring ice cream to events on UD’s Wilmington and southern Delaware campus locations. It will be stocked with a rotating list of between 10-20 flavors carried in freezers that make transporting the ice cream to those far reaching events that much easier.

Melinda Litvinas, manager of the UDairy Creamery, said she has dreamed of having an ice cream truck since she arrived at UD in the winter of 2010.

“It makes everything much more efficient from an operational standpoint because we’re not loading freezers onto a van and worried about electricity, and we’re not limited in the amount of space that we have,” said Litvinas. “This allows us to be out and about longer and with more ice cream and more flavors to serve more people.”

Mark Rieger, CANR dean, said the partnership of the two colleges in bringing the ice cream truck to the University is “yet another way that UD demonstrates its commitment to quality undergraduate education.”

He added the project would bring students from the two colleges together in an atmosphere designed to foster creativity. “CANR students will work side-by-side with Lerner students to find new markets and learn to be entrepreneurial with our UDairy Creamery ice cream. Real-world experience is a value that both colleges strongly support.”

Bruce Weber, Lerner dean, echoed those sentiments, saying, “An essential element of the Lerner College’s strategy is to emphasize experience driven learning more than any other business school, and this is just a perfect fit with that objective.”

Weber also stressed the importance of interdisciplinary partnerships. “Interdisciplinary is not optional,” he said. “We’ve got to be doing it and we’ve got to be doing more of it. There’s no longer an argument for siloed disciplinary based activities in universities. The exciting activities in universities now are at the intersections of fields – combine entrepreneurship with a dairy farm that makes ice cream and the whole is much greater than the sum of its parts.”

The partnership established between the two colleges involves the UDairy Creamery and the Horn Program in Entrepreneurship, an academic program at the University made possible by alumnus Charles W. Horn and his wife Patricia that is centered on entrepreneurial education.

Dan Freeman, associate professor of business administration and director of the Horn Program in Entrepreneurship, said the program is open to all students at the University, not just those who attend the Lerner College.

The Horn Program, he said, “offers a variety of courses, degree programs and co-curricular activities, all aimed at helping students to learn about entrepreneurship and develop an entrepreneurial mindset and the knowledge and skills needed to be entrepreneurial.”

Freeman said that teaming with the UDairy Creamery made sense because it allows entrepreneurial students the ability to get hands-on experience in a real-world setting.

Freeman plans to integrate the truck into the Horn Program curricula for youth programs and its Introduction to Entrepreneurship course. Students will learn about the economics of the truck, generate and screen opportunities for deploying the truck, formulate operational and go-to-market plans, and then implement the plans.

They will also get to see how well their financial forecast maps on to real-world profit and loss from following their plans.

“It’s a known business but at the same time it can be a new business each and every time you drive out of the driveway. From an entrepreneurial education standpoint, that is perfect,” said Freeman.

“I know it’s cliché but it’s definitely win-win,” said Weber. “We’re doing something that’s going to bring the UDairy Creamery product to lots more places, but it’s also going to provide an entrepreneurial experience to a lot of students. It’s a perfect example of experience driven learning.”

For more information, visit the UDairy Creamery website, follow the creamery on Twitterand visit the Facebook page.

Article by Adam Thomas

Photos by Danielle Quigley

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University’s UDairy Creamery dishes out winter delights

January 10, 2013 under CANR News

Although ice cream may not be the first thing on everyone’s mind throughout these cold winter months, things do not slow down at the University of Delaware’s UDairy Creamery, where fresh ice cream is made daily.

Of the limited-edition flavors that were released for the holiday season, some are still being offered. Among them are amaretto cookie, peppermint hot chocolate and the best-selling holiday flavor, peppermint bark.

This year, too, the creamery is developing winter flavors – something it has never done before.

UDairy Creamery ice creamAccording to Melinda Litvinas, UDairy Creamery manager, they are working to create new flavors that will be released this month, some of which will remind us of warmer days. Although most of the soon-to-be-released flavors are still under wraps, one promised delight is coconut.

Another premier event for the creamery is the development of a new, intriguing flavor to be created in honor of the 90th anniversary of UD’s study abroad programs. Details are being kept quiet until the flavor has been finalized.

For those looking to keep warm, UDairy Creamery also offers a nice variety of hot drinks. While the specialty is homemade hot chocolate with homemade whipped cream, the creamery also provides tea, various flavors of coffee and cappuccino.

The creamery is hoping to attract visitors during this season’s sporting events, and is serving at all men’s and women’s home basketball games. The Fred Rust Ice Arena is also providing free UDairy Creamery ice cream during Family Fun Weekends being held Jan. 26 and Feb. 17.

Winter hours

The winter hours are very agreeable to the season with the UDairy Creamery open until 7 p.m. every night, and opening at 9 a.m. Monday through Friday and at 11 a.m. on weekends.

For those who have a craving for delicious ice cream, but find the creamery – located off South College Avenue near UD’s Townsend Hall — a little out of the way, limited flavors of ice cream are sold at the University of Delaware’s Barnes and Noble Bookstore and at Marriott’s Courtyard Newark-University of Delaware.

The ice cream continues to be sold in all the markets on campus, including Rodney, Harrington and the POD on the Laird Campus.

Article by Samantha Walsh

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UDairy Creamery holds ‘Ice Cream Carnival’ to raise money for ice cream truck

October 24, 2012 under CANR News

In order to help raise funds to bring an ice cream truck to the University of Delaware campus, the UDairy Creamery hosted an “Ice Cream Carnival” on Friday, Oct. 12, from 1-5 p.m. on The Green.

The creamery is hoping to get an ice cream truck in order to service not only areas of the main Newark campus, but also to be able to travel to spots in southern Delaware.

“Another push for this ice cream truck is so that we can get ice cream down to the Georgetown campus and the Lewes campus in southern Delaware,” said Melinda Litvinas, manager of the UDairy Creamery. “We really wanted something for the State Fair, and that will help with other events, as well, and will allow us to simplify our process and bring more flavors.”

Litvinas added that the creamery’s goal is to have an ice cream truck by summer 2013.

An estimated 300 people showed up for the carnival and enjoyed all of the various activities taking place, from ice cream tasting to dizzy bat races to Merrily the Clown making balloon animals.

There was also an ice cream eating contest that took place at 2, 3 and 4 p.m. The last contest featured Homecoming court candidates, Blue Hen athletes and Newark Mayor Vance Funk.

Student groups that helped out with the carnival included Alpha Gamma Rho, Sigma Alpha and the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA).

Litvinas said that the creamery may have more fundraisers in the future but that since officials are hoping to have the ice cream truck ready to go by next summer, they are now pursuing private donations in order to supplement the cost.

For more information about the ice cream truck project, email Litvinas or call her at 302-831-2486.

Article by Adam Thomas

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UD’s Hunt lands job as store manager with Hopkins Farm Creamery

August 27, 2012 under CANR News

Until he came to the University of Delaware, Jacob Hunt had never worked with ice cream. Now, as a 2012 graduate who had worked at the UDairy Creamery since the summer after his sophomore year, Hunt has secured a job as the store manager at the Hopkins Farm Creamery in Lewes, Del.

Though he didn’t have any experience with ice cream specifically before coming to UD, Hunt did grow up with a dairy background. “My family always had a dairy, and my cousin was in the cheese business for a little bit and I would help him out,” said Hunt, explaining that this early exposure helped spark his interest in dairy foods.

Hunt, who majored in animal and food sciences with a minor in agriculture business marketing at the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR), got in on the ground floor with the UDairy Creamery, literally beginning work when the creamery was just “a garage with four freezers and some ice cream.”

Hired as the UDairy Creamery assistant manager, Hunt had to organize the creamery’s four-member management team, as well as manage external events and develop new business connections. As he describes it, he also served as UDairy Creamery Manager Melinda Litvinas’ “extra limb.”

“Jake became an integral part of the creamery during his two years as assistant manager,” Litvinas said. “He served as a leader for the creamery before, during and after the storefront opened, and his motivation and passion served as a key factor in the creamery’s success.”

Hunt’s favorite part about working at the creamery was interacting with students and administration at campus events. He also said that it was great to see the creamery rise from being the simple garage setup with four freezers to being a full-blown store.

He credits the time spent working at UDairy for helping prepare him for his current role at the Hopkins Farm Creamery. “I think from the overall general management standpoint, it helped me a lot. I’ve run into a lot of things here that I didn’t have the privilege of experiencing at UD but there it was a lot more event-centric and marketing-centric. Here it’s a lot more employee-centric, and employee management.”

With 28 employees to manage, most of whom are high school students, Hunt said that scheduling takes up a lot of his time but that every day is different. “The things that are always consistent are that if we’re short staffed, I’ll be in there scooping ice cream or if we’re running out of ice cream, I’ll be in there making ice cream. And that’s something that I’ve definitely appreciated,” said Hunt.

As for his relationship with the UDairy Creamery, Hunt said that during his third week on the job he reached out to Litvinas for some advice but that he hasn’t been able to reach out recently because of how busy both creameries have been.

Using essentially the same process as UDairy, the Hopkins Farm Creamery takes the milk from the 500 milking cows on their Green Acres Dairy Farm and sends it to Cloverland Dairy in Baltimore to be converted into ice cream base. Hopkins offers 24 flavors of ice cream that they have all the time, as well as two flavors of Italian ice, two flavors of sherbet and then two seasonal flavors during the summer and three seasonal flavors during the fall.

Hunt said that he likes all of Hopkins’ flavors, but if he had to pick, his favorite would be black raspberry. “I’m a bit of a traditionalist, and our black raspberry is awesome.”

For more information on Hopkins Farm Creamery, visit the website.

Article by Adam Thomas

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UDairy Creamery serves its 100,000th cone

July 17, 2012 under CANR News

Colleen Seemans walked into the UDairy Creamery on Monday, July 16, looking for a cold cone of ice cream to help out with the oppressive heat. She walked away with a whole lot more.

Seemans was fortunate enough to purchase the Creamery’s 100,000th ice cream cone. As the individual responsible for getting the Creamery to its 100,000th ice cream cone sold in little over one year of operation, Seemans received 52 coupons for free ice cream, and a UDairy tote bag filled with a UDairy Creamery hat, shirt, plush cow and bumper stickers.

“I’m so surprised, I can’t even believe it,” said Seemans. “I was debating whether or not to come get an ice cream cone for myself and it’s my lucky day I guess.”

Seemans, who graduated from the University of Delaware in 1993 with a degree in exercise physiology and whose husband is an alum of UD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, said that she brings her family to the UDairy Creamery about 10 times during the summer and that her favorite flavor is the Delaware River Mud Pie.

Melinda Litvitnas, UDairy Creamery manager, said that the Creamery had wanted to do something special for the lucky patron who purchased the 100,000th cone.

“I was going through our item sales statistics and when I added up how many ice cream cone servings we had, it was at about 89,000 so I knew we were close.” Litvinas said that getting to 100,000 cones equals 143 tons of ice cream, or roughly the weight of 200 cows. Out of those scoops served by the UDairy Creamery, Litvinas noted that 7 percent of the patrons like sprinkles on their cones.

Litvinas also said that getting to 100,000 shows how great the community support has been for the Creamery during the past year.

“Without the support of the UD community and its alumni, we wouldn’t have been able to reach our milestone because other than marketing to the UD community, everything else has been word of mouth.”

Litvinas also marveled at how fast they reached this number. “Fourteen months ago we weren’t even open, and the fact that we’ve learned how to make ice cream and serve that many people in this amount of time is pretty awesome.”

As for plans for their 200,000th cone, Litvinas said, “I guess you’ll just have to wait and see.”

For more information on the UDairy Creamery, visit its website.

Article by Adam Thomas

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UDairy Creamery gets birthday cake, new flavor at Ag Day 2012

May 1, 2012 under CANR News

The unseasonable cold did not stop people from making tracks to Ag Day 2012. This year’s event featured a free flight bird show, a beehive demonstration, a tree climbing exhibition, live bands and a special birthday party for the UDairy Creamery, which celebrated the opening of its doors one year ago at Ag Day 2011.

At the birthday celebration, Robin Morgan, dean of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR), welcomed everybody to Ag Day 2012 and thanked those responsible for organizing the event.

Morgan then focused on the UDairy Creamery birthday celebration, saying, “We broke ground two years ago, last year we cut the ribbon and today we’re going to have a birthday cake.”

Katy O’Connell, communications manager for CANR, spoke next, thanking all those in attendance and taking a moment to recognize Morgan, who will be stepping down as dean and returning to the faculty at the end of this academic year.

O’Connell thanked Morgan for everything that she has done for CANR, saying, “She has just been such a wonderful support for Ag Day and the team. And anytime we’ve had a new idea, she’s supported us wholeheartedly.  She’s always here every Ag Day from the minute we open until the last table is taken down. She’s really been great and we wanted to thank her especially at this Ag Day.”

Morgan was then in for a surprise treat as O’Connell handed over the microphone to Melinda Litvinas, UDairy Creamery manager, who informed Morgan that the creamery has created a special flavor in Morgan’s honor.

Litvinas said, “We don’t know if Dean Morgan has noticed this yet, but in honor of her support of the UDairy Creamery in the past years, we’re now selling ‘Robin’s Egg,’ which is vanilla ice cream with chocolate chunks and toffee pieces.”  The flavor was inspired by a submission by Mark Barteau, UD senior vice provost for research and strategic initiatives, in the fall Blue Hen Signature Flavor Contest.

Litvinas went on to announce that the creamery will now be making and selling their very own ice cream cakes, which will be available in different sizes in the store, and can be ordered on-line at the creamery website.

The birthday cake, made by Leigh Ann Tona, a management major with an entrepreneurial studies minor who works at the creamery, was then unveiled and Jacob Hunt, a senior in CANR and assistant manager of the UDairy Creamery, led the crowd in singing Happy Birthday.

Article by Adam Thomas

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UD’s Food Science Club bakes sweet potato pies for Food Bank of Delaware

November 21, 2011 under CANR News

To help those in need, the University of Delaware Food Science Club teamed up with the Food Bank of Delaware to bake delicious sweet potato pies for the Thanksgiving holiday. Those pies will be distributed as part of the Food Bank of Delaware’s mobile food pantry taking place at Eisenberg Elementary School in New Castle from 5-7 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 22.

Club members estimate that they baked close to 80 pies this year using sweet potatoes grown in the Garden for the Community and ingredients bought through the Food Science Club budget.

The Garden for the Community is located on one-third of an acre on UD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) campus and provides a steady stream of fresh vegetables, herbs and fruits to Delaware’s hungry. The garden is a partnership between the Food Bank of Delaware and the CANR faculty and staff, undergraduate students and graduate students. Last year, the Garden for the Community donated three tons of vegetables, fruits and herbs to the Food Bank of Delaware.

Patricia Beebe, Food Bank of Delaware president and CEO, noted the importance of their relationship with the University. “As we work to feed more Delawareans, the importance of fresh, sustainable produce cannot be emphasized enough. The pie project is a perfect example of farm to table — sweet potatoes grown right here in Delaware to feed residents of our state. Last year the families who received these freshly-made pies were incredibly appreciative.”

About 20 students, mostly from the Food Science Club but also from the Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority, helped out this year, doing prep work and baking pies from 12:30-4 p.m., Wednesday, Nov.16, through Friday, Nov. 18.

Kali Kniel, associate professor in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences, helped coordinate the event and Melinda Litvinas, manager of the UDairy Creamery, helped the club by ordering all of the ingredients necessary to bake the pies.

Teresa Brodeur, a CANR junior and president of the Food Science Club, said she wanted to get involved with the Food Bank of Delaware after attending service events with her service fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega, last spring. “One of the service events that I attended weekly was at the Food Bank where we helped to organize the different donated food items. I really enjoyed the people who were in charge there and they made the experience both educational as well as enjoyable.”

Having missed out on baking the pies last year due to a schedule conflict, Brodeur, who one day hopes to open her own bakery, said that she was really looking forward to taking part in the event this year because “everyone seemed like they had so much fun last year.”

For more information on the Food Bank of Delaware, visit the website.

Article by Adam Thomas

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