Students battle rice blast disease with underground microbes

November 30, 2010 under CANR News

Rice is the most important grain consumed by humans, providing more than one-fifth of the calories sustaining the world’s population. By some estimates, however, global production of rice could feed an additional 60 million people, if it weren’t for rice blast disease, caused by the fungus Magnaporthe grisea.

This past summer, four students from the University of Delaware and two of its partner institutions in Delaware’s National Science Foundation EPSCoR program, Delaware State University and Delaware Technical and Community College, found themselves on the front lines of the battle to defeat rice blast.

Those battle lines have been drawn on opposite coasts of the United States, through a collaboration between scientists in Delaware and at the University of California at Davis, the land-grant institution of the UC system. The students therefore split their summer internship between laboratories in both states.

The project is led by Harsh Bais, professor in UD’s Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and the Delaware Biotechnology Institute, and is funded by the National Science Foundation.

The full article with photos can be viewed online on UDaily by clicking here.

Article courtesy of Beth Chajes, DENIN

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