UD WATER undergraduate internships available

August 31, 2012 under CANR News

Three undergraduate internship opportunities are available to work with the University of Delaware Watershed Action Team for Ecological Restoration (WATER) project during the fall 2012 semester through the spring 2013 semester.

Interns may work up to 150 hours, paid at $10 per hour, and will have an opportunity to gain experience in areas such as geohydrology, ecological engineering, soil and water conservation, water resources management, and environmental education.

Internship requirements include an overall GPA of 3.0 or greater, the willingness to work in both the fall 2012 and spring 2013 semesters and to participate in periodic project meetings with the UD WATER team.

Interested students should visit the Delaware Water Resources Center website to download an application.

The deadline to apply for the internship is Friday, Sept. 28.

Applications should be sent to Maria Pautler, research associate in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Department of Plant and Soil Sciences.

The UD WATER Project is a multi-disciplinary project focused on water resource management and water quality, with an emphasis on practices and programs that minimize UD’s impact on the White Clay creek, a wild and scenic river whose tributaries flow through the UD campus, and the Christina River.

The UD WATER Project team currently consists of faculty and professionals associated with the Delaware Water Resources Center, the UD Water Resources Agency, the Delaware Geological Survey, the University’s Stormwater Management and Grounds programs, and the City of Newark.

Interns will be selected and can begin work on their projects by October 5, 2012.

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CANR fights stormwater runoff to help White Clay Creek

May 17, 2011 under CANR News

After the storm has passed, the damage isn’t done. In fact, for White Clay Creek, the destruction is just beginning.

Much of the University of Delaware’s campus, including the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) farm, drains into Cool Run, a tributary of White Clay Creek. Because the creek has been designated as a National Wild and Scenic River, a designation spearhead by Vice President Joseph R. Biden, Jr., a UD alumnus, the University now has the distinction of being one of only two universities in the country to have a National Wild and Scenic River run through its campus. Because of this, there is an urgency to quell the impact of stormwater runoff into the creek.

Stormwater runoff, unfiltered water that reaches bodies of water by flowing across impervious surfaces, enters White Clay Creek through multiple sources throughout the city of Newark and the UD campus. Because of this, CANR has teamed with partners from across the University and the city to see what can be done to help reduce the University’s contribution to the problem, activity that has led to the formation of the University of Delaware Watershed Action Team for Ecological Restoration (UD WATER).

UD WATER is led by Tom Sims, deputy dean of the college and the T.A. Baker Professor of Soil and Environmental Chemistry, and Gerald Kauffman, state water coordinator and director of the Water Resources Agency, a unit of the Institute for Public Administration. It includes faculty members from the University as well as members from the city and the Delaware Geological Survey and UD student interns.

In addition to many other projects undertaken on the CANR farm to stop stormwater pollutants from reaching White Clay Creek, the UD WATER team decided another step to curb stormwater runoff was to create a biological filtration system on the CANR campus.

Read more at UDaily > >

Article by Adam Thomas

Photos by Danielle Quigley

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