3 CANR professors awarded UDRF projects

July 17, 2013 under CANR News

Jeff Buler studies ticks across newark, delawareDelaware has one of the highest incidence rates of Lyme disease in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control. The tick-borne disease can have debilitating consequences in humans, dogs, even cats.

University of Delaware scientist Jeffrey Buler aims to see the number of infections decline.

“In urban areas, humans face the greatest exposure to infected ticks along forest edges,” says Buler, who is an assistant professor of wildlife ecology in UD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

With funding from the University of Delaware Research Foundation (UDRF), Buler will use radio telemetry to track bird movements in a network of 21 fragmented patches of forest in and around Newark, Del. He wants to better understand the role that birds may play in dispersing ticks in these forested areas.

UDRF, a private corporation chartered in 1955, awards seed funding on a competitive basis to researchers early in their careers at UD.

“The University of Delaware Research Foundation is tremendously valuable to our research community, particularly in these times of federal funding austerity,” says Charlie Riordan, UD vice provost for research. “These seed funds are critical for our new faculty to collect the preliminary data necessary to establish proof of concept and convince the funding agencies their ideas are worth further investment.”

A holistic approach to reduce tick-borne diseases in an urban landscape. Wildlife ecologist Jeff Buler and doctoral student Solny Adalsteinsson will study bird movements in 21 forest fragments in and around Newark, Del., to better understand how birds influence tick survival and distribution. This project will contribute to the development of an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategy to manage ticks that spread Lyme disease.

Impact of land-use activities on pollinators. Deborah Delaney, assistant professor of entomology and wildlife ecology, will survey pollinator communities in northern Delaware to determine pesticide exposure levels in spring-summer 2013 and 2014 during the bloom periods for many trees and shrubs. Exposure risk will be linked with land-use activities such as agriculture, suburban lawns and gardens, roads, parking lots and other impervious surfaces.

Exploring plant immortality. Although climate-induced stress has caused plant mortalities worldwide, some plants native to the Baja desert can live over 500 years. Rodrigo Vargas Ramos, assistant professor of plant and soil science, will conduct experiments to understand the physiological mechanisms of resilience of long-lived plants in arid ecosystems, with special emphasis on carbon allocation.

Article by Tracey Bryant

Photo by Danielle Quigley

To read about the rest of the UDRF projects, check out the full article on UDaily.

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Deb Jaisi awarded UDRF project funding

June 13, 2012 under CANR News

The University of Delaware Research Foundation (UDRF), a private corporation chartered in 1955 to support UD research, has funded 11 new projects in science and engineering on the UD campus.

Each project is supported by a $35,000 grant — a combination of $25,000 from UDRF and $5,000 each from the provost and the researcher’s dean. The grants seed original, high-priority, “proof of concept” studies that are designed to lay the groundwork for future proposals to external agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and others.

“Typically, only a small percentage of the competitive research proposals submitted to federal agencies are funded,” said Mark Barteau, senior vice provost for research and strategic initiatives. “UDRF provides early career University of Delaware researchers with a critical opportunity to test new ideas and collect data that may give them a competitive edge later on, as they develop external proposals.”

Deb Jaisi, assistant professor of plant and soil sciences, has received UDRF funds to study the Chesapeake Bay. The Chesapeake Bay suffers from varying degrees of eutrophication, a reduction in water quality due to excessive nutrients. Jaisi will analyze a key nutrient, phosphorus, in bay sediment cores and water samples to determine the changes of terrestrial phosphorus phases over time and their relationship to hypoxia, or oxygen depletion. Oxygen isotopes in phosphate will help identify the sources and biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in sediment and the water column, yielding data useful to nutrient management programs.

To read about the other UDRF funded projects, visit UDaily.

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