2015 Outreach Project Update: Bright Spot Farms

Over the past few months, the Fellows have been busy working on their annual Professional Outreach Project. This experiential project is designed to offer the Fellows an opportunity to engage with regional professionals, gain project management experience, and work collaboratively within a specific area interest in public horticulture. This year the Fellows have partnered with Bright Spot Farms, a social enterprise program of West End Neighborhood House in Wilmington that offers hands-on horticultural job training to young adults aging out of Delaware’s foster care system. Together with the staff from Bright Spot, the Fellows are working to create an updated business and program plan to serve as a guide to increase the efficiency and sustainability of this unique and important initiative.

Bright Spot Farms Team at the Cool Spring Farmers' Market (photo courtesy of Bright Spot Farms)

Bright Spot Farms Team at the Cool Spring Farmers’ Market (photo courtesy of Bright Spot Farms)

So what exactly have they been busy doing all summer with this project? The Fellows have conducted interviews and surveys, engaged in benchmarking with similar programs all over the region and nation, become regulars at the Cool Spring Farmers’ Market (which is run by Bright Spot), followed the Mobile Market all over Wilmington, and have eaten some seriously delicious local produce grown at Bright Spot.

Read more about the great work of Bright Spot Farms or see (and taste) for yourself at the Cool Spring Farmers’ Market!

Northeast Region: Day 3

On Wednesday, the Fellows filled their day with visits to incredibly diverse and beautiful Trustees properties. At the first stop, Appleton Farms, Beth Zschau, ‪Education and Engagement Manager, vibrantly described an approach to telling the story of place through the lens of agriculture. Appleton Farms is considered to be the oldest operating farm in the United States, having celebrated its 375th anniversary just last year. With a rich connection between farmers and the land at Appleton, Beth and her team are offering new and creative ways to continue exploring those relationships between people and place. With a 650 member CSA, farm to table events, culinary classes, cheese production, and children’s programming, Appleton Farms offers the community engaging ways to connect to the food they eat and the history of the land on which it grew.

The Fellows enjoy picking strawberries at Appleton Farms

The Fellows enjoy picking strawberries at Appleton Farms

_DSC0488

Delicious!


After touring the agricultural operations of Appleton, the Fellows visited the Appleton Farm Grass Rides. This unique landscape has an unclear history of use, but is currently being managed through fire to protect the New England Blazing Star (Liatris scariosa var. novae-angliae). Through dedication to observation and documentation, Trustees staff and volunteers have been able to see this population of Liatris stabilize over the past few years, and hope to watch it grow in the coming seasons.

Hiking up to the Grass

Hiking up to the Appleton Farms Grass Rides

The Fellows spent the remainder of the breezy June afternoon with Dan Bouchard, Superintendent at Long Hill and Sedgewick Gardens, an absolute treasure trove for plant geeks. Every corner and turn revealed a different garden “room” filled with unusual, rare, and stunning plants. Dan’s deep horticultural skill and natural curiosity have helped this historic family garden continue to evolve as a spectacular collection of horticultural treasures.

_DSC0589

Gorgeous Peonies at every turn.

_DSC0567

The lovely Long Hill House, tucked in the gardens.

_DSC0534

A little frog enjoying the beauty of the gardens.

_DSC0547

Styrax japonicus, dripping in blooms.

Submit a Proposal for the 2015 Professional Outreach Project!

Fellows working at Wyck Historic House, Garden, and Farm during the 2014 Professional Outreach Project

Fellows working at Wyck Historic House, Garden, and Farm during the 2014 Professional Outreach Project

Only one week left to submit a proposal for the 2015 Professional Outreach Project! This annual project allows the Fellows to partner with a local institution to complete a project in a specific area of horticulture. Need a refresher on past Outreach Projects? Visit our blog to see projects from years past. This year the Outreach Project will focus on engaging a broader community through a collaborative, cross-institutional project. This project may include, but is not limited to, one or more of the following related areas: marketing an event or program co-sponsored by multiple institutions, developing interpretation for a collaborative exhibit or display, communication strategies for institutional partnerships, or some aspect of fundraising for cross-institutional projects.

Take a look at our request for proposals for more information or to submit a proposal.

Be sure to check back soon for more Outreach Project updates!

 

Farewell, Japan!

On our last morning in Japan we enjoyed a few hours of free time perusing bustling shops and tasting new food in Osaka. A few of us ventured out to the ever popular Dōtonbori shopping district which was busy, crowded, and full of life, even on a run-of-the-mill Friday morning. Dōtonbori is known as a historic theater area turned eccentric shopping district, and certainly lived up to its bustling reputation. In addition to satisfying all of our Hello Kitty purchasing needs, we were able to sample some takoyaki: battered and fried octopus, a famous street food in Japan.

Delicious takoyaki!

Delicious takoyaki!

Busy Dōtonbori district on Friday morning.

Busy Dōtonbori district on Friday morning.

After returning to the hotel, packing our bags, and buying one last matcha-latte, we were ready to say goodbye to the sleek, fast-paced, and endlessly beautiful country of Japan. Many hours, three flights, and one lost bag later we were home in snowy Pennsylvania. We’re happy to be home, and are even happier to have spent the past two weeks getting to know such an incredible country with an incredible history of horticulture!

Lovely view from the road as the Fellows travel to the airport.

Lovely view from the road as the Fellows travel to the airport.

Chrysanthemum and Camellia

Snowy mounting views from the bullet train

Snowy mountain views from the bullet train

Sunday, January 18

Back on the Shinkansen bullet train, the fellows headed east to join Ms. Tomoko Tsujimoto and two of the TRIAD fellows at the Aichi ToyoakeFlower Wholesale Market, the largest flower market in Japan. The group was privileged to spend time with Mr. Akihiko Nagata, Chairman of Directors of the Aichi Toyoake Flower Marketing Co-operation, while he shared with us an introduction to the characteristics that categorized classic chrysanthemums as well as the Japanese culture surrounding growing chrysanthemums. As Mr. Nagata explained to us, Japanese Kiku (chrysanthemum) culture does not simply involve planting, pinching, and displaying mums, but involves an entire lifestyle and culture complete with music, art, and food.

The Longwood Grad Fellows meet two new TRIAD fellows, Rhiannon Harris and Phil Brown

The Longwood Grad Fellows meet two new TRIAD fellows, Rhiannon Harris and Phil Brown

After questions, discussions, and a tea ceremony with Mr. Nagata, the fellows were let loose like kids in a candy store in one of the flower distribution warehouses.

Fran Jackson shows the way to the flower distribution warehouse

Fran Jackson shows the way to the flower distribution warehouse

After dragging us out of one candy store, we drove off into the country to a different kind of candy store, Mr. Satoru Maeda’s camellia nursery. Mr. Maeda, a hobby camellia grower, shared with us the basics of what he’s been learning and practicing with camellias for the past 50 years along with the tradition of camellia growing and collecting in Japan. We were blown away as Mr. Maeda and his son, Kazuaki Maeda, pulled beautiful camellia after beautiful camellia out of the greenhouses.

image

A lovely Camellia at Maeda Nursery

A lovely Camellia at Maeda Nursery

image
Our last day in historic Kyoto was filled to the brim with more history and tradition behind Japanese horticulture. We’re off to Osaka tomorrow!

Kiku, Sogetsu, and Wagashi

 

Beautiful Shinjuku Goyen National Garden

Beautiful Shinjuku Goyen National Garden

Tuesday, January 13

By the third morning in Japan, the Fellows were able to effortlessly navigate the Tokyo subway system to Shinjuku Goyen National Garden. This incredible garden is famous for its rich history of kiku (chrysanthemum) culture and we were privileged to spend time learning from the masters behind this kiku operation, Mr. Yutaka Matsui and Mr. Kodai Nakazawa.

Mr. Kodai Nakazawa shares the chrysanthemum growing facilities at Shinjuku Goyen National Garden

Mr. Kodai Nakazawa shares the chrysanthemum growing facilities at Shinjuku Goyen National Garden

This green oasis in the middle of busy, crowded Tokyo is home to an annual kiku festival featuring seven display beds of chrysanthemums, each bed with its own set of symbolism and traditions that dictate color, cultivar, and placement of each mum.

Tokyo rising above the trees in beautiful Shinkjuku Goyen

Tokyo rising above the trees in beautiful Shinkjuku Goyen

As we toured the gardens, we were able to observe first-hand some of the thorough attention to detail demonstrated not only in kiku but in all of traditional Japanese horticulture.

Detailed tree pruning in Shinjuku Goyen National Garden

Detailed tree pruning in Shinjuku Goyen National Garden

In the afternoon, we took our first baby steps in the world of ikebana, a traditional form of Japanese flower arranging. At the Sogetsu Center, Ms. Kiri Teshigahara, grand-daughter of the founder of the Sogetsu School of Ikebana, welcomed us and gave us an introduction to the rich history and art of Ikebana. After watching a skilled demonstration by Ms. Koka Fukushima, the Fellows tried their hand at Sogetsu Ikebana. Although we began with the same materials, each arrangement slowly took on the personality of its creator.

Sogetsu Art Center in Tokyo

Sogetsu Art Center in Tokyo

Ms. Koka Fukushima demonstrating Ikebana

Ms. Koka Fukushima demonstrating Ikebana

In an effort to authentically experience local culture, the Fellows rounded out the afternoon with a trip to a traditional Japanese wagashi (confections) shop. One of the cakes we tasted has been made from the same recipe since the 1700s. Tradition never tasted so good!

So many delicious treats to choose from!

So many delicious treats to choose from!

2015 Symposium Emerging Professionals Travel Award

symposium graphic-print full date

The Longwood Graduate Program is excited to announce a new Emerging Professionals Travel Award to attend the 2015 Longwood Graduate Symposium. This day-long event features speakers, panel discussions, and conversations on a topic geared towards public garden and museum professionals.

This year’s Symposium, “To Preserve or Change: Redefining Heritage to Guide the Future,” will explore how institutions evolve while honoring their past. Emerging museum or garden professionals in the Philadelphia region and beyond, including students and interns, are encouraged to apply and join in this important dialogue.

Please follow the link to Download the Travel Award Application.
Visit the Symposium online for more information.
Thank you in advance for spreading the word!