Category Archives: General

Second Year = Board Positions

One exciting aspect of being a Longwood Graduate Fellow is that in the second year of the program we are appointed to sit as an observer on the Board of a local institution of horticulture.  I was appointed to the Tyler Arboretum and attended my first Board meeting last week.

Big Tree (Sequoiadendron giganteum) Small girl

One of Tyler’s Treasures   (Sequoiadendron giganteum)

 

A non-profit organization’s Board of Directors (or Board of Trustees in Tyler’s case) has numerous responsibilities. Its purpose can vary depending on the institution, but in most cases the purpose is to provide guidance and oversight.  The responsibilities can include maintaining momentum, approving finances, overseeing fundraising, working in committees and promoting the institution.

I have often wondered what the Board really does and how influential they are. I’ve wondered how the Board members can be effective. Sitting in on my first Board meeting at Tyler seemed like a good way to start my investigation.

The meeting took place near the end of the workday and lasted about an hour and a half.  There were snacks and refreshments since it was a scorcher of a summer day.  A variety of topics were covered, a few things were voted upon, some great news was shared, some questions asked, research assigned, events noted, updates given and then there was a motion to close the meeting.  Pretty standard fare as I understand it, but what I enjoyed the most was seeing the way the Board members interacted with me and with eachother.  As I watched them work through the various issues at hand I noticed a few common threads that seemed to define the individuals.  I noted the following items that seemed like the six ‘must-do’s’ being effective:

  1. You have to be realistic but you have to be fearless
  2. You have to be willing to ask questions when things don’t make sense and ready to celebrate the small victories when they do.
  3. You have to have genuine interest in the institution, yet be able to keep your perspective.
  4. You have to figure out how far a dollar will go without sacrificing your mission or the quality of your work.
  5. You have to be excited by the opportunity to look for and design alternative solutions and when you find them you have to be willing to accept them.
  6. You have to choose the right people and then trust them to do their job.

I look forward to my year observing Tyler’s Board of Trustees and plan to periodically check-in on the LGP blog with the new insights gained about the purpose of Boards and the methods that make them most effective.

 

 

 

 

 

2013 Spring Electronic Recycling Day

Photography by LGP fellows

Friday May 10th, marked the Longwood Graduate Program’s final Electronic Recycling Day (E.R.D.) for the 2012-2013 School year and the final event hosted by the Environmental Impact team for the Class of 2013.

On such a momentous day, it’s only appropriate that every single Fellow, our attentive program secretary, Patty, and our dedicated director, Dr. Bob Lyons, were all present to participate. Even better, we collected more electronics than ever before.
Photo May 10, 11 30 48 AM

We collected more than three truckloads of electronics from the South Campus buildings. These included, televisions, computers, laptops, VCRs, scanners, various appliances, batteries, light bulbs and cellphones just to name a few.

DSC_0004According to eWaste, Inc.  Electronic recycling has many important benefits:

By dismantling and providing reuse possibilities, intact natural resources are conserved and air and water pollution caused by hazardous disposal is avoided. Additionally, recycling reduces the amount of greenhouse gas emissions caused by the manufacturing of new products. It simply makes good sense and is efficient to recycle and to do our part to keep the environment green.

DSC_0015We are so happy to provide this opportunity to lighten the load of our landfills.

In closing, don’t forget to hold onto your old electronics for the next E.R.D (December 2013) and cheers for a productive and fancy free summer season from the Fellows at the Longwood Graduate Program’s Environmental Impact Team.

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Longwood Graduate Program’s Annual Symposium – Come and get some fresh perspectives and inspiring ideas

With the deadline for registration coming up on the 8th of March we hope you have already registered for this year’s Longwood Graduate Program Annual Symposium.  This year the Symposium aims to encourage public gardens and cultural institutions to examine how they can stay relevant within the ever-changing social landscape.

Speaker Highlight: Louise Chawla

Louise Chawla

Louise Chawla

One exciting relatively new field of research that can provide public gardens with some innovative answers to this age-old question is conservation psychology. This year we are privileged to have Louise Chawla who will not be only giving a broad introduction to this exciting field but also highlight some of the issues it addresses with practical examples.  Louise Chawla is a professor in the Environmental Design Program at the University of Colorado in Boulder, co-editor of the journal Children, Youth and Environments, and associate director of the Children, Youth and Environments Center for Community Engagement. Some of her popular publications include the books In the First Country of Places: Nature, Poetry and Childhood Memory and the edited collection Growing Up in an Urbanizing World.

In addition to her presentation Louise Chawla will conduct an interactive workshop during the Special Sessions that aims to help participants understand the principles involved in designing environmental programs that encourage care for the environment. This session can accommodate a limited amount of participants, so be quick to register to avoid disappointment.

For those of you who can’t make it out to Longwood Gardens there is also the possibility to participate via our webcast. Also, we want you to contribute to the conversation whether you can be there or not on Twitter or TweetChat at #lgpsymp.

Symposium 2013: One Month Away!

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The Fern Floor at the Longwood Gardens Conservatory

Photography: Laurie Metzger

The Longwood Graduate Program’s Annual Symposium, Shifting Landscapes: Cultivating Connections with a Broader Community, is a little less than a month away!  If you are on the fence about attending, let me paint you a picture…

When you arrive at Longwood Gardens Visitor’s Center, you are greeted by the Graduate Students and Longwood’s friendly staff.  Beyond the glass doors, the garden steals your gaze, beckoning you into the crisp early spring morning. This is a special time in the garden.  The fresh air invigorates you.  Just as you begin admiring the spring bulbs, you catch a glimpse of the magnificent conservatory on the hill.

The scent of orchids intermingled with the aroma of fresh brewed coffee lead you to Longwood’s historic ballroom where your day of cultivating connections begins.  You’re surrounded by stunning beauty and thought provoking conversation.

This year’s Symposium boasts fresh perspectives and a delicious menu.  A Bistro style lunch will feature a variety of offerings from soups and salads to risotto cakes and vegetable dumplings.  Fine meats and savory vegetarian options will leave no guest unsatisfied.  Lunch will be held on the elegant Patio of Oranges with lots of opportunity for conversation.

This year’s Symposium will make use of advanced technology forums such as Twitter in addition to recognizable tools like chalk boards to help us creatively answer questions posed by our speakers. The multi-leveled discussion will spark imaginations and generate opportunities for growth in our public gardens.  Interacting with on-line viewers in addition to those in attendance, will allow for collaboration between States and Nations!

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The Flower Walk at Longwood Gardens

The day will finish with optional behind-the-scenes tours of various aspects of Longwood Gardens in addition to an optional, limited seating session with speaker, Louise Chawla.  Finish your day at the Symposium by prolonging your exploration and experience Longwood Gardens: Beyond the Garden Gates.

Please join us on March 15th 2013 for The Longwood Graduate Program’s Annual Symposium.  Shifting Landscapes: Cultivating Connections with a Broader Community. To register, click here. See you there!

 

Electronic Recycling Day

Author/Photography: Chunying Ling

With the high speed development of technology, electronics have been generated rapidly, and often just as quickly disposed rather than recycled. In an effort to reduce the College of Agriculture and Natural Resource’s (CANR) environmental impact, Longwood Graduate Program (LGP) Fellows hosted Electronics Recycling Day (ERD) once again on the South Campus of the University of Delaware. The purpose of ERD is to redirect electronic items to recycling facilities rather than the landfill.  

Students, staff and faculty brought their retired, obsolete and broken electronics to Townsend Hall.  “These computers have been sitting in my apartment for years, now they finally got home,” a faculty member of CANR said when he was handing over generations of computers and monitors.

It has only been five months since the LGP hosted the last ERD, but we still collected a significant amount of recyclable electronics. For those items that are still in good working conditions, an adoption section was set aside for any passers-by. Some students took printers, monitors and a laptop, all in working condition.  For the first time, the donated cell phones were sent to a national center for reconditioning and future use by residents of domestic violence shelters.



In total, 4 televisions, 7 DVD/ VHS /beta players, 10 keyboards and mouse, 14 printers, 10 monitors, 2 laptops 7 CPU’s, 2 old tape deck/ 8-track players, 2 microwaves/ toaster ovens, about 10 pounds of batteries, several light bulbs and countless miscellaneous items were collected during the three hour collection period. The LGP Fellows and their Director, Dr. Robert Lyons, transferred all the materials to University General Services for sorting disassembly, and recycling.

Thank you all for utilizing Electronic Recycling Day.  It was a great success!

A Trip to Cornell

Photography: Longwood Graduate Fellows

At the peak of fall color in mid-October, all ten Longwood Graduate Fellows and our Director, Dr. Lyons, journeyed to Ithaca, New York for a field trip to Cornell Plantations. Before sunrise on the first day, we set out from Townsend Hall.

Cornell Plantations at Cornell University offers a Master’s Degree of Professional Studies in Public Garden Leadership not unlike Longwood Gardens and the University of Delaware’s Master’s of Science in Public Horticulture. Cornell’s program has four Fellows (two a year,) University of Delaware’s program has ten (five per year.) Both programs focus on leadership in public horticulture. The trip provided a wonderful opportunity for all of us to connect.

Director Don Rakow and the Cornell students planned an interesting, personalized two-day excursion. Upon arrival we enjoyed lunch and introductions. We met with various members of the Plantations staff to discuss interpretation and new signage and then participated in a small project with the Youth and Education staff. Later, we embarked on our tour of the Botanic Garden and the Arboretum. Many beautiful views, vantage points and photo ops ensued.

Day two started in a downpour. Undeterred, we walked Cornell’s picturesque campus to find our lecture hall. Professor Mike Hostetler, whose main research and teaching interests are in strategy, decision-making, leadership, and high performance, generously led us in a leadership workshop. The discussion centered on an article by John Kotter called, What Leaders Really Do. We discussed the differences between management and leadership, the importance of both and how to cultivate them. The topics were stimulating and insightful and I think I can speak for all when I say that we didn’t want the session to end.

The rain cleared, giving way to blue skies and glistening colorful foliage. Venturing into one of the many Plant Science buildings, we enjoyed a delightful lunch arranged by the Cornell Fellows. After that we visited the Hortorium and learned a bit of Cornell history. We toured the natural lands for an in depth view of deer destruction, the current methods of mitigating the problem and a grim prediction for the future of our forests if we don’t do something soon! We enjoyed an interesting late afternoon hike of Park Park with Botanist, Robert Wesley. Park Park boasts Sugar Maples, Black Maples and Eastern Hemlock that are hundreds of years old. Our final stop was the Ithaca Children’s Garden, where we met with Director and former Cornell Graduate Fellow, Erin Marteal. Ithaca Children’s garden is doing wonderfully innovative work engaging children of all ages.

We finished our trip with a delicious dinner at the Boathouse Restaurant. Armed with photographs, new friendships and new knowledge for career connections we departed, leaving behind an invite to the Cornell Fellows for a visit us at UD and Longwood gardens next year!

First year Fellows visit Chanticleer

(written by Laurie Metzger, photographs by Chunying Ling)

It was a sunny, sometimes cloudy– typically capricious Autumn day in Eastern PA when we made a visit to Chanticleer. A seeming anomaly in a region dominated by DuPont estates turned public gardens, Chanticleer is the estate of the Rosengarten family, of pharmaceutical fame. Named after an estate in Thackeray’s novel The Newcomes, Chanticleer was originally the family’s summer home.  They spent a pretty penny readying the house to become their full time residence. The name consequently came from a line in from the novel, “mortgaged to the very castle windows but still the show of the county.” In addition the family played on the fact that Chanticleer is the name of the Rooster from the Nun’s Priest Tale in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.  Over time, the rooster became a kind of mascot for the estate.

Chanticleer’s website explains that “everything is carefully orchestrated…” in the garden. This truly describes the enchanting impression that Chanticleer left with us.  I would add to it, “thoughtfully, with love and appreciation.” The ambiance at Chanticleer is like being in the presence of a person who celebrates each tiny detail of life’s rhythm, the vast variety of beauty in plants, and the special qualities that make people individuals.  The stories of the landscape, of the family, and of each structure, inspires awe wrapped in a feeling of affection. Creativity abounds.  Beautiful patterns are revealed in furniture, banisters and container gardens. No pattern is repeated yet everything fits.  In this way, Chanticleer is like walking in a tangible dream.

The garden design seamlessly mixes old and new.  This allows guests to imagine they had walked into another time, but still feel right at home. Chanticleer aims to be ‘a pleasure garden.’ Forgoing plant labels for plant lists hidden in beautiful boxes, each one is creatively constructed by one of Chanticleer’s staff.  One gets the feeling that the Horticultural staff members are like elves, displaying their secret talent for detail as metal artisans, master wood workers and florists all over the 37 acre garden.

The first frost was predicted for the evening of our visit, so the staff was hard at the more practical work of covering, moving and preserving the plants in the outdoor tropical displays.  We were gifted with a special tour by Chanticleer’s director, Bill Thomas.  He wove the story of Chanticleer, revealing a philosophy of generous freedom and trust in his staff.  In addition, working at Chanticleer sounds delectably creative and full of opportunities to grow.  Each member of the staff is encouraged to “take their time,” knowing they are a part of “the important garden experience.”   Chanticleer believes in doing a job well to start because it will last longer in the end.

The garden shed mimics a carriage house and has always stood that way.  The vegetable garden is filled with charming cultivars, especially the hardy Kiwi—a juicy snack for an observant, hungry passer by.  A restroom facility was recently built in the Asian Woods (the point furthest from the entrance.) Designed to look like a Japanese Tea house it’s humorously and unofficially called the “Pee House.”  Featuring stonework and artwork by staff and friends, this project gives opportunity to artist, horticulturist and facilities manager alike.

Chanticleer is lovely from start to finish, magnificent, splendid, special and not unlike Chaucer’s description of the Rooster…

 …There was not his equal in all the land. His voice was merrier than the merry organ that plays in church, and his crowing from his resting place was more trustworthy than a clock. His comb was redder than fine coral and turreted like a castle wall, his bill was black and shone like a jet, and his legs and toes were like azure. His nails were whiter than the lily and his feathers were like burnished gold.

-The Nun’s Priest Tale, Canterbury Tales

 

Mt. Cuba Center

August 17, 2012 – Mt. Cuba Center, Hockessin, DE
(written by Lindsey K. Kerr, photographs by Chunying Ling)

Bright and early, the First Year Fellows and Dr. Lyons left Townsend Hall for Mt. Cuba Center in Hockessin, Delaware. Mt. Cuba Center was founded by Mrs. Lammot du Pont Copeland at the site of her home. In 1935, Mr. and Mrs. Copeland built a stately house they named “Mt. Cuba” and soon afterwards began developing the original agricultural landscape into a series of garden spaces.

The Copelands took a particular interest in plants native to the Piedmont, which was typical of their home site. From the time they moved in until Mrs. Copeland’s death in 2001, the gardens grew in both number of individual plants and diversity of appropriate species. Today, the Copeland’s house and gardens are maintained by Mt. Cuba Center staff and the organization itself has become a non-profit dedicated to native plants of the the Appalachian Piedmont Region.

Upon our arrival, we were warmly greeted in the parking lot by Longwood Graduate Program alumna Julia Lo-Ehrhardt. She escorted us to the Main House and introduced us to the senior staff. We spent the rest of the morning with Interim Executive Director Steve Martinenza and his senior team learning about Mt. Cuba’s strategic plan and management practices. The different managers introduced us to the history of Mt. Cuba, the founding family, and how Mt. Cuba continues to evolve and grow to fulfill the vision of its founder. We learned about Mt. Cuba’s research and educational programs as well as its commitment to improving the visitor experience and making stronger connections with the public. Mt. Cuba staff discussed their respect for Mrs. Copeland’s ideas and aesthetics and their challenge to embrace the future. They want to enhance native plant accessibility for the average homeowner and encourage their greater use in garden design.

Later in the afternoon we headed outside for a tour of the grounds. First stop was the new Trial Gardens, which were two years in the making and initially planted in spring 2012. Gardener George Coombs explained the goals of the trial garden as we admired the set-up and the plants. The trial gardens aren’t just focused on the latest introductions—they are also trialing tried-and-true cultivars to find out which ones are really the best for gardeners in the region.

Horticulturalist Marcy Weigelt then gave us a quick walking tour of the West Slope Path, the ponds, and the meadow garden, soon pausing in the meadow garden to admire the large number of pollinators and several exotic praying mantises. We finished up our field trip with a visit to the greenhouses where staff grow approximately 10,000 plants every year. In the future, they plan to start collecting more seeds locally for propagation as part of Mt. Cuba’s commitment to native plants of the Piedmont region.

Visiting Mt. Cuba Center was a wonderful experience and a great way for First Year Fellows to finish up their summer field trip series of DuPont legacy gardens!

LGP Symposium One Month Away

The Longwood Graduate Symposium, The Panda and the Public Garden: Reimaging our Conservation Message, is less than one month away, and we are busy as bees pulling together the last details of what will be a most enjoyable symposium experience – true to the Longwood tradition.

This year's graphics designed by Wonsoon, Sara, and Felicia

 

 

The Guest Relations Committee is dedicated to creating a pleasant and accommodating guest experience for our symposium registrants, so that you may enjoy the lecture sessions to the fullest.  This includes organizing a delicious menu for the day, prepared by Longwood’s in-house catering services.   Coffee and baked goods will be available when registration opens at 8 am – just in case you do not have time to grab breakfast at home.  A lunch buffet will be offered at mid-day, followed by a lovely spread of sweet treats and Longwood’s famous pretzel twists at the afternoon break.  Refreshments will be offered after the final lecture, so please stay for lemonade and a chat with the speakers and guests.

 

Podium decorated with flowers.

 

In keeping with the Longwood Graduate Program’s commitment to sustainability, the Guest Relations Committee has made an effort to reduce waste and use of non-recyclable materials.  Your registration packet has been cleverly designed by Fellow Nate Tschaenn to be in a booklet format printed on FSC paper.  The booklet approach will reduce the amount of paper needed to produce the packet compared to previous years. Compostable cutlery and dishware will be used for food service and later sent through Longwood’s composting system.

Ballroom during 2010 Symposium.

If you have not yet registered, please do so soon!  Click here to be directed to our quick and easy online registration system.

And if you are traveling from afar and need a place to stay, the Guest Relations Committee has arranged for discounted rooms at the Hilton Garden Inn Kennett Square for registrants.  Please book by February 16th to reserve your room.  Click here to be directed to the special reservation page.

For more information regarding the symposium, please visit our official website or contact us at longwoodsymposium@udel.edu.

 

We look forward to seeing you there!

Quill Teal-Sullivan and the Guest Relations Committee

 

 

Safely in Singapore

January 8, 2012 – Singapore Zoo, Singapore
(written by Martin Smit, photographs by Nate Tschaenn )

Everything went seamlessly as our group all ascended on Singapore from various corners of the earth. The drive to the hotel immediately blew us away because of the scale of landscaping everywhere and the beautiful epiphyte smothered street trees. After booking in at our hotel some of us explored the immediate surroundings while others briefly caught their breath before we headed out for our visit to the Singapore Zoo. We were warmly received by the enthusiastic staff and were quickly astonished by the amazing gardens and surroundings of this wonderful zoo. We were also informed about some of the conservation and education efforts that were undertaken at this institution. We were taken behind the scenes where we had the opportunity to interact with various staff members and of course, some animals.

A quick photo opportunity with some local zoo residents

Sara with some ring-tailed lemurs

Fellows in a section of the zoo displaying ethnobotanic plants

Our first impressions of Singapore were wonderful, not only because of the beauty of this urban paradise but also because of the extremely helpful and friendly people that we have met thus far. It already promises to be an unforgetful experience.