Announcing: The 2017 Longwood Graduate Symposium & Travel Award!

 

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Greetings from the Longwood Graduate Program!

Save the date and spread the word! The Longwood Graduate Symposium will be held on Friday, March 3, 2017.

The Longwood Graduate Program Symposium is a daylong event featuring speakers, panel discussions, and conversations on a topic geared towards public garden professionals. This year’s Symposium, Growing Together: Gardens Cultivating Change in the Economic Landscape, will explore research on the economic impact of gardens, advocacy for nonprofit organizations, effects of urban revitalization, and public gardens as economic drivers. For the third year in a row, a Travel Award will be given to eligible emerging professionals, including students, to engage a new generation in this important subject.   

Click here for additional information about the Travel Award, including the application. The deadline for applications is Sunday, January 8, 2017.

Further updates (including open registration and speaker announcements) will be posted through this blog (http://agdev.anr.udel.edu/longwoodgradblog/) as well as our Facebook page.

For questions about the Travel Award, please contact Erin Kinley at ekinley@udel.edu. Questions about the Symposium event can be sent to Elizabeth Barton at ebarton@longwoodgardens.org.

A Daring Symposium

This year’s Longwood Graduate Program’s annual Symposium, “Daring Dialogue, Public Gardens Engaging in Today’s Tough Topics,” wove the themes of relevance, diversity, conservation and horticulture together to create a powerful narrative.

The day’s ten speakers addressed the theme of Daring Dialogue from a variety of perspectives. Keynote speaker Dr. Paul Smith, Secretary General of Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI), began the day by describing how the world’s 2,500 botanic gardens can be part of the solution to many of Earth’s social and environmental problems. Dr. Smith pointed out that botanic gardens are well placed to deliver plant-based solutions to many of the major environmental challenges facing us, including food security and climate change.

Dr Paul Smith from BGCI delivering the morning keynote

Dr. Paul Smith from BGCI delivering the morning keynote

An inspiring session of case studies followed the keynote. Joseph McGill addressed interpretation of slave-dwellings in public gardens, Sarah Pharaon discussed world-wide international sites of conscience, and Guina Hammond described the remarkable healing powers of community gardens. All three speakers received heartfelt rounds of applause.

Next, Nayra Pacheco of Just Communities spoke about the need for role models in public horticulture to foster diversity in our organizations. Using the concept of “mirrors and windows,” Nayra emphasized to the audience, “You can’t be what you can’t see.” It was a powerful reminder that there is much for public gardens yet to do to create more diverse and inclusive institutions.

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Nayra Pacheco speaking on why diversity in public gardens matters

Lunchtime was abuzz with conversation after the morning sessions! Lunch provided this year’s emerging professional travel award winners with the chance to meet local and international public gardens professionals, and also gave a break for the online audience, who participated from locations as far afield as Australia.

TIm Heslop, qualified professional gardener and current international triad Fellow, travel award winners Bryce Patz from Purdue University and TJ Graveline from University of Tennessee Knoxville, and Jack Shilley, RHS Cert 3 and Director of Young Hort.

Horticulturist and Triad Fellow Tim Heslop of Longwood Gardens, travel award winners Bryce Patz of Purdue University and TJ Graveline of University of Tennessee Knoxville, and Jack Shilley, Director of Young Hort

Jeff Jubelirer continued after lunch with a talk on crisis communication, followed by a conversation about creative engagement with Linda Norris and Rainey Tisdale. Next, at the Dessert and Dialogue breakout session, guests were challenged to deliberate on several of the biggest questions facing public gardens. The Dessert and Dialogue session was lead by skilled facilitators from our local public gardens, Cornell University, and BGCI.

Dr. Don Rakow (second from the right), from Cornell University facilitates a Dessert and Dialogue discussion. Dr. Casey Sclar, President of the American Public Gardens Association listens on.

Dr. Don Rakow (second from the right, facing), from Cornell University facilitates a Dessert and Dialogue discussion. Dr. Casey Sclar, President of the American Public Gardens Association listens on at left

Jack Shilley inspired the audience with his talk about his U.K. based YoungHort initiative. As Director of YoungHort, Jack works to encourage more young people towards the profession of horticulture. Paul B. Redman, Executive Director of Longwood Gardens, concluded the day with a rousing talk on why public gardens matter. The timeliness of Paul and Jack’s talks was highlighted by the launch, one day earlier, of the Seed Your Future campaign. Seed Your Future is an initiative of more than 150 partner organizations, including Longwood Gardens and the American Society for Horticultural Science, to promote horticulture as a vital and viable career choice.

Mr. Paul Parvis and Mrs. Martha Parvis with the travel award winners and the Longwood Graduate Fellows

Mr Paul Parvis and Mrs Martha Parvis with the travel award winners and the Longwood Graduate Fellows

By the end of the day, we were tired but happy Fellows. Our goal of sparking conversation around some of today’s challenging issues was made possible through the support of our sponsors, speakers and attendees.

We acknowledge and thank the contribution of all our speakers:  Dr. Paul Smith (BGCI), Mr. Joseph McGill (the Slave Dwelling Project), Ms. Sarah Pharaon (International Sites of Conscience), Ms. Guina Hammond (Pennsylvania Horticultural Society), Ms. Nayra Pacheco (Just Communities/Comunidades Justas Santa Barbara), Mr. Jeff Jubelirer (Bellevue Communications Group), Ms. Linda Norris (The Uncatalogued Museum), Ms. Rainey Tisdale (Independent Curator), Mr. Jack Shilley (Founder and Director YoungHort), and Mr. Paul B. Redman, Executive Director, Longwood Gardens.

First year Fellows Grace Parker, Tracy Qui and Erin Kinley, and Winterthur's Chris Strand.

Winterthur’s Chris Strand and first year Fellows Grace Parker, Tracy Qui, and Erin Kinley

We are grateful to our sponsors for their support. The event sponsors: Longwood Gardens, the Parvis Family Endowment, the University of Delaware College of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, and the University of Delaware Department of Plant and Soil Sciences. The Emerging Professional Travel Award major sponsors: the American Public Gardens Association, the Chanticleer Foundation and Mount Cuba Center. We would also like to thank additional sponsors of the travel award, Adkins Arboretum and the Longwood Graduate Program alumni.

Our special thanks to the local public gardens dialogue sponsors, who contributed questions and facilitators for Dessert and Dialogue: Adkins Arboretum, Bartram’s Garden, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve, Chanticleer, Delaware Nature Society, Hagley Museum and Library, Jenkins Arboretum and Garden, Longwood Gardens, Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, Mt Cuba Center, The Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College, Tyler Arboretum, and Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library.

Horticultural discussions with Fran Jackson, Symposium Lead Fellow and Meenal Harankhedkar, Historic London Town and Gardens' Director of Horticulture.

Horticultural discussions with Fran Jackson, Symposium Lead Fellow and Meenal Harankhedkar, Historic London Town and Gardens’ Director of Horticulture

Announcing the 2016 Emerging Professional Travel Awardees

The Longwood Graduate Program in Public Horticulture is pleased to announce the Emerging Professional Travel Awardees for the 2016 Longwood Graduate Program Symposium. We are excited to have this group of talented individuals represent their institutions and contribute to the dialogue throughout the day!

Emma Erler, Heritage Museums & Gardens
Anna Fialkoff, New England Wildflower Society
TJ Graveline, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Jessie Loftus, Como Park Zoo and Conservatory
Shawn Overstreet, University of California-Davis
Bryce Patz, The Purdue Arboretum
Maddison Paule, Jenkins Arboretum & Gardens
David Michael Pease, University of Tennessee
Mark Stewart, Toronto Botanical Garden
Melissa Tinling, North Carolina State University
Kerrie Van Gaalen, University of British Columbia Botanical Garden & Center for Plant Research
Benjamin Whitacre, The American Horticultural Society
Alexa Wright, North Carolina State University

This award, in its second year, is given to students, interns, and garden or museum professionals in the beginning stages of their career. Congratulations to our 2016 Awardees!

Special thanks to our Emerging Professional Travel Award sponsors for their support: American Public Gardens Association, Mt. Cuba Center, The Chanticleer Foundation, Adkins Arboretum, and Longwood Graduate Program Alumni

Registration for the live-streaming symposium webinar is still available via our website! Online participants will interact with a facilitator throughout the day, including during the Dessert and Dialogue session. Please see our website for speakers, talk descriptions, and schedule of the day. Join the conversation online: #LGPSymp2016 #DaringDialogue

Photo: Richard Donham

Photo: Richard Donham

Reminder: Symposium Travel Award Applications due Friday!

Send your applications in this week for the Emerging Professionals Travel Award! Awards will be given to eligible emerging professionals, including students, to engage a new generation in this important dialogue.

Click here for further information about the Travel Award, including the application. The deadline for applications is this Friday, January 8, 2016.

More information about the 2016 Longwood Graduate Program Symposium: Daring Dialogue:

Public gardens and cultural institutions are centers of community, science, and art. Today’s society is often overwhelmed with debates in all of these areas. In a world where misspoken words amplify in a matter of minutes, how can institutions tactfully open discussion on today’s difficult topics? When and where do they provide research, resources, and opportunities to interact with new or contested ideas?

The 2016 Longwood Graduate Program Symposium, Daring Dialogue, will navigate the questions and higher callings of cultural institutions. Discover how we are prepared to address challenging issues such as environmental action, civic responsibility, and the evolution of public gardens as community assets.

Registration opens Friday, January 8.

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Announcing: 2016 Longwood Graduate Program Symposium & Travel Award

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Save the date for the 2016 Longwood Graduate Program Symposium and spread the word about the Emerging Professionals Travel Award!

Public gardens and cultural institutions are centers of community, science, and art. Today’s society is often overwhelmed with debates in all of these areas. In a world where misspoken words amplify in a matter of minutes, how can institutions tactfully open discussion on today’s difficult topics? When and where do they provide research, resources, and opportunities to interact with new or contested ideas?

The 2016 Longwood Graduate Program Symposium, Daring Dialogue, will navigate the questions and higher callings of cultural institutions. Discover how we are prepared to address challenging issues such as environmental action, civic responsibility, and the evolution of public gardens as community assets.

Emerging Professionals Travel Award Application Available Now! 

We are also excited to announce our second annual Emerging Professionals Travel Award to attend our 2016 Symposium! The Travel Award will be given to eligible emerging professionals, including students, to engage a new generation in this important dialogue.

Click here for further information about the Travel Award, including the application. The deadline for applications is Friday, January 8, 2016.

Thank you in advance for spreading the word!

Counting Down to the 2015 LGP Symposium

by Bryan Thompsonowak

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In 25 days, Longwood Gardens will be hosting the Longwood Graduate Program Symposium, To Preserve or Change: Redefining Heritage to Guide the Future. Inspired by the New Heights: Fountain Revitalization Project and the legacy of Pierre S. duPont, the Fellows have organized an exciting day of speakers, a redesigned format, and a new exhibit featuring objects of historical significance from local institutions. Additionally, we will support emerging professionals from around the world by providing competitive travel grants funded by former LGP Fellows.

This year, a wide variety of speakers will represent some of America’s most prestigious and oldest institutions with a wealth of talent and experience. To maximize our time with them, we have introduced a few new presentation opportunities. There will be in-depth presentations, engaging short talks, an interactive panel discussion, and generous break times to allow attendees to mingle with speakers and colleagues.

Please join us March 6th in the Longwood Gardens Ballroom. For more information or to register, please visit the 2015 Longwood Graduate Program Symposium site.

2015 Symposium Emerging Professionals Travel Award

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The Longwood Graduate Program is excited to announce a new Emerging Professionals Travel Award to attend the 2015 Longwood Graduate Symposium. This day-long event features speakers, panel discussions, and conversations on a topic geared towards public garden and museum professionals.

This year’s Symposium, “To Preserve or Change: Redefining Heritage to Guide the Future,” will explore how institutions evolve while honoring their past. Emerging museum or garden professionals in the Philadelphia region and beyond, including students and interns, are encouraged to apply and join in this important dialogue.

Please follow the link to Download the Travel Award Application.
Visit the Symposium online for more information.
Thank you in advance for spreading the word!

Meet our final two speakers!

We are only a few days away from our 2014 Annual Symposium From Tie-Dye to Wi-Fi: Envisioning the Next Generation of Leadership in Public Horticulture. To build on the excitement, here are the descriptions for two of our esteemed speakers, Dr. Judy Mohraz and Dr. Casey Sclar.

Dr. Judy Mohraz

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Dr. Judy Mohraz

Dr. Judy Mohraz is a Trustee and the President/CEO of Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust, a private foundation in Arizona. Focused on health, education, children, arts and culture, older adults and religious organizations, the Trust invested over $22 million in Greater Phoenix the past year. Previously Dr. Mohraz served as president of Goucher College in Baltimore. She was a presidential appointee to the Board of Visitors of the United States Naval Academy, co-chairing a special committee to review the Academy. She received her Bachelor of Arts and Masters in History from Baylor University and her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. At the Symposium, Dr. Mohraz will talk about the process of becoming a leader in 21st century cultural organizations.

 

Dr. Casey Sclar

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Dr. Casey Sclar

Appointed in 2012, Dr. Casey Sclar is the Executive Director of the American Public Gardens Association. He and his team support over 520 gardens and their 6000+ allied members located throughout America and in 14 other countries. Collectively these gardens reach over over 70 million people per year and help to realize APGA’s vision – “A world where public gardens are indispensable”. Just prior to APGA, he served 15 years at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, PA as the Plant Health Care Leader – directing the Soils and Compost, IPM, Land Stewardship, and other sustainability programs. Dr. Sclar holds a B.S. degree in horticulture from California Polytechnic State University, S.L.O., as well as M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in entomology from Colorado State University. In 2011, he received the APGA’s Professional Citation Award for outstanding achievements in public horticulture. Dr. Sclar will address some of the questions and issues with regards to identifying the future leaders in public horticulture.

Once again, if you are unable to attend the Longwood Graduate Symposium in person, you can view the free webcast. We will also be taking the conversation online via Twitter, so be sure to follow us @Longwoodgrad and use #LGPSymp to join the conversation. We hope to see you all at the Symposium!

 

Meet Two More of the 2014 Symposium Speakers!

By this time next week, the Fellows will be preparing for the arrival of our six Symposium speakers. We can hardly wait! Don’t forget that the deadline for registration is Monday, March 3rd. In the meantime, several of our speakers have put together a list of suggested readings to help get you thinking about the topic of the day – leadership!

Today we are highlighting two more of our speakers, Teniqua Broughton and morning keynote Alpesh Bhatt.

 

Speaker Highlight: Teniqua Broughton

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Teniqua Broughton

Several current fellows had the pleasure of meeting Teniqua Broughton at the 2013 APGA Annual Conference in Phoenix, Arizona. As a six-year Trustee of the Desert Botanical Garden, Ms. Broughton has played a vital role in developing young professionals for board positions through the founding of Desert Botanical Garden’s Monarch Society and Council. She is also the founder of VerveSimone Consulting Firm, which works with clients to provide leadership, governance and administrative advice for their respective organizations. At the Symposium, she will address her experience with the Monarch Society and Council and provide ways to attract and engage younger, emerging professionals as potential new board members.

 

Keynote Speaker Highlight: Alpesh Bhatt

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Alpesh Bhatt

Alpesh Bhatt comes to us from the Center for Leadership Studies (CLS) in New Jersey where he is Principal and Managing Partner. His firm partners with a variety of clients to develop leaders within their organization, and he spends most of his time “on the ground,” supporting executives one-on-one in understanding and mastering the challenges of leading “business breakthroughs.” He is also on the faculty of the Graduate Psychology Department at the University of New Haven. Mr. Bhatt has published a short book, The Triple-Soy Decaf-Latte Era, which has been called a “mini MBA for the 21st Century.”  At the Symposium, he will speak about creating a lasting, positive change in an organization.

We hope you can make it! If you are unable to attend the Longwood Graduate Symposium in person, you can view the free webcast (more information to follow). We will also be taking the conversation online via Twitter, so be sure to follow us @Longwoodgrad and use #LGPSymp to join the conversation.  Stay tuned for our final speaker highlights, coming to the blog next week!

2014 Symposium Speakers Highlight

The winter of 2014 has been hard here in Delaware. We’ve had over a foot of snow at times. Classes at the University have been cancelled more than once. Nevertheless, the Longwood Graduate Program is hard at work preparing for our Annual Symposium! We are counting down the days and cannot be more excited about this year’s event.

On March 7, 2014, all of our months of planning and preparation will come together in a day of engaging lectures, discussions, and networking, focused on the theme of  creative leadership and succession planning within public horticulture institutions. Leadership and planning for the future are always in the minds of public horticulture professionals, but it is becoming a more pressing issue as the baby boomer generation prepares to retire from the workforce. We hope that this Symposium will inspire organizations to cultivate leadership within their own staff and, at the same time, create dialogue on how public gardens and other cultural institutions can continue to proactively think and plan for their futures.

In order to bring fresh ideas to our field of public horticulture, we chose six speakers with diverse experiences and a wide range of expertise. We are delighted to welcome Michael Hostetler (Cornell University), Dr. Judy Jolley Mohraz (Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust), Teniqua Broughton (VerveSimone Consulting Firm), Dr. Casey Sclar (American Public Gardens Association) and our two keynote speakers, Alpesh Bhatt (The Center for Leadership Studies) and Lynden Miller (Public Garden Design).

 

Speaker Highlight: Michael Hostetler

Mike Hostetler, Cornell University

Traveling from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, Michael Hostetler will explore in his presentation the meaning of leadership in the context of public horticulture. Second year fellows met Mr. Hostetler in the fall of 2012 when we visited Cornell Plantations. We so enjoyed the workshop that he conducted for us that we are thrilled to welcome him to our Symposium.

Michael Hostetler is a faculty member of the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. Mr. Hostetler’s main research and teaching interests are in strategy, decision-making, leadership, high performance teams, and change management. Mr. Hostetler is also the author of on-line courses in strategic thinking, scenario planning, leadership and team effectiveness for eCornell, Cornell’s distance learning subsidiary. Prior to joining Cornell University, Mr.  Hostetler was assistant dean for executive education at the Fuqua School of Business, Duke University. His prior experience also includes positions with St. Mary’s Medical Center, the University of Tennessee, and the Office of the Governor of Kentucky. He is generously sponsored by Chanticleer.

 

Keynote Speaker Highlight: Lynden Miller.

Lynden Miller, Public Garden Design

We are so privileged to have Lynden Miller as this year’s Parvis Family Endowment Keynote Speaker. Ms. Miller is a public garden designer in New York City and the Director of The Conservatory Garden in Central Park, which she rescued and restored beginning in l982. Based on her belief that good public open spaces can change city life, she has designed many other gardens and parks in all five boroughs since that time. She is on the Board of Trustees of the Central Park Conservancy, New Yorkers for Parks and the New York Botanical Garden and teaches about public space and horticulture at New York University and Columbia University. She is the author of Parks, Plants and People: Beautifying the Urban Landscape, published by Norton in 2009.  The book was the winner of American Horticultural Society 2010 National Book Award. She will be speaking about inspiring people with a passion for plants to make their careers in urban horticulture.

For those of you who can’t make it out to Longwood Gardens, you have the option to participate via our webcast (more information to follow). You can also participate by tweeting with us throughout the day on Twitter or TweetChat. Use #LGPSymp to join the conversation.

With the deadline for registration coming up on the 3rd of March, we hope that you have already registered for the Longwood Graduate Program Annual Symposium.  To learn more or to register, please visit our website.