Tag Archives: conservation

Day 1 of NAX at The Arnold Arboretum

 

(Photography by: Chunying Ling)

Our introduction to the Arnold with Michael Dosmann

Our introduction to the Arnold with Michael Dosmann

We had perfect weather for our first day of NAX at the Arnold Arboretum.  We were greeted upon arrival by Former Fellow and Supervisor of Horticulture, Andrew Gapinski.  A few minutes later we met Michael Dosmann, Curator of Living Collections. Before long, Kyle Port, of Plant Records and Joyce Chery, the Curatorial Fellow joined us. Holding six NAPCC collections (Acer, Carya, Fagus, Stewartia, Tsuga and Syringa) and boasting 15,000 individual accessions, it was clear from the moment we arrived that the Arnold Arboretum is an abundant, dynamic resource..

Tree of Heaven on the path designed for seeing the trees of the world

Tree of Heaven on the path designed for seeing the floras of the world

As the enchanting fragrance of the Katsura tree filled our senses, we listened to the story of America’s first arboretum, established in 1872, at the generous bequest of James Arnold.  A deal was struck between the City of Boston and Harvard University to preserve the Arboretum’s land in perpetuity. Many familiar names are a part of the Arnold’s sensational history, including Liberty Hyde Bailey, J.P. Morgan, Beatrix Farrand and Frederick Law Olmstead. The very path we were walking along was originally designed to allow visitors to “appreciate the floras of the world without even getting out of their carriages…”

Largest Franklinia in the world

Largest Franklinia in the world

 

Although the original mission of the Arnold’s 281 acres was, “…to plant every tree, shrub, vine and herbaceous plant that could grow in Boston…,” the staff has had to make strategic decisions about the collections. To do so, they created a plant Inventory Operations Manual in addition to a Landscape Management plan. (Both are available in their entirety on their website (http://arboretum.harvard.edu/plants/collections-management/.) They have completely digitalized their archive including maps, photographs and correspondence.

 

American Beech predating the Arboretum

American Beech predating the Arboretum

Nestled in the hills are forsythia and roses mixed with incredible tree giants that pre-date the Arboretum. The first Acer griseum ever planted in American soil lives at the Arnold. More recently, the Vine and Shrub garden was redesigned with diagonal beds and galvanized steel arbors. This garden is impressively maintained and manicured by two very bright horticulturists.

 

We spent our lunch with some of the knowledgeable and passionate ladies of the education staff, Daphne Minner, Nancy Sableski and Julie Warsowe. In varying capacities, these ladies design and implement educational programs that serve everyone from the casual visitor to the students in the Boston public schools.

 

The Arnold's secret Bonsai collection

The Arnold’s secret Bonsai collection

Our visit with the Librarian, Lisa Pearson, revealed even more treasures, including a rare book of hand painted botanical drawings.

 

In the afternoon, we met Oren McBee, Manager of the Dana Greenhouses and Nursery. Here plants are methodically propagated and grown from seed. Once mature, they are planted out in the Arboretum.  Oren also gave us a sneak peak at the Arnold’s historic bonsai collection.

 

Our last stop was the new research building at Weld Hill. Bathed in natural light and recycled wood, the building is stunning. Our tour was expedited by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation.  This peek into the possibilities of plant science research was a fine way to punctuate our whirlwind day at the Arnold Arboretum.  Stay tuned for Day 2 of NAX.

The Arnold's emblem The Dawn Redwood

The Arnold’s emblem The Dawn Redwood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mt. Cuba Center

August 17, 2012 – Mt. Cuba Center, Hockessin, DE
(written by Lindsey K. Kerr, photographs by Chunying Ling)

Bright and early, the First Year Fellows and Dr. Lyons left Townsend Hall for Mt. Cuba Center in Hockessin, Delaware. Mt. Cuba Center was founded by Mrs. Lammot du Pont Copeland at the site of her home. In 1935, Mr. and Mrs. Copeland built a stately house they named “Mt. Cuba” and soon afterwards began developing the original agricultural landscape into a series of garden spaces.

The Copelands took a particular interest in plants native to the Piedmont, which was typical of their home site. From the time they moved in until Mrs. Copeland’s death in 2001, the gardens grew in both number of individual plants and diversity of appropriate species. Today, the Copeland’s house and gardens are maintained by Mt. Cuba Center staff and the organization itself has become a non-profit dedicated to native plants of the the Appalachian Piedmont Region.

Upon our arrival, we were warmly greeted in the parking lot by Longwood Graduate Program alumna Julia Lo-Ehrhardt. She escorted us to the Main House and introduced us to the senior staff. We spent the rest of the morning with Interim Executive Director Steve Martinenza and his senior team learning about Mt. Cuba’s strategic plan and management practices. The different managers introduced us to the history of Mt. Cuba, the founding family, and how Mt. Cuba continues to evolve and grow to fulfill the vision of its founder. We learned about Mt. Cuba’s research and educational programs as well as its commitment to improving the visitor experience and making stronger connections with the public. Mt. Cuba staff discussed their respect for Mrs. Copeland’s ideas and aesthetics and their challenge to embrace the future. They want to enhance native plant accessibility for the average homeowner and encourage their greater use in garden design.

Later in the afternoon we headed outside for a tour of the grounds. First stop was the new Trial Gardens, which were two years in the making and initially planted in spring 2012. Gardener George Coombs explained the goals of the trial garden as we admired the set-up and the plants. The trial gardens aren’t just focused on the latest introductions—they are also trialing tried-and-true cultivars to find out which ones are really the best for gardeners in the region.

Horticulturalist Marcy Weigelt then gave us a quick walking tour of the West Slope Path, the ponds, and the meadow garden, soon pausing in the meadow garden to admire the large number of pollinators and several exotic praying mantises. We finished up our field trip with a visit to the greenhouses where staff grow approximately 10,000 plants every year. In the future, they plan to start collecting more seeds locally for propagation as part of Mt. Cuba’s commitment to native plants of the Piedmont region.

Visiting Mt. Cuba Center was a wonderful experience and a great way for First Year Fellows to finish up their summer field trip series of DuPont legacy gardens!

We came, we learned things, and a great time was had by all.

(photos by Nate Tschaenn & Raakel Toppila)

That’s a wrap for our 2012 Symposium! Months of hard work came to fruition at last on March 2, where we had a beautiful day to enjoy the Longwood displays and hospitality, as well as fantastic presentations by our speakers.

With well over a hundred attendees and twenty-one webcast audience members signing in from across the country (and even the UK), the Symposium went smoothly thanks to the diligent leadership of Symposium Lead Fellow Ashby Leavell, along with Assistant Lead Quill Teal-Sullivan. Even with all the parts that each Fellow had to play throughout the day to keep the event running, it’s safe to say that we were still able to enjoy the Symposium itself, as we hope our attendees did!

Our registration table all set up for the day.

Ashby Leavell opening up the Symposium.

Keynote speaker Jerry Borin, former Executive Director of the Columbus Zoo.

John Gwynne, former Chief Creative Officer and Vice President for Design at the Bronx Zoo.

Dr. Alistair Griffiths, Horticultural Science Curator, presents the history and current happenings of the Eden Project in the UK.

Kathy Wagner, Consultant and former Vice President for Conservation and Education at the Philadelphia Zoo.

The first half of the dynamic “storytelling session,” featuring storyteller Sally O’Byrne of the Delmarva Ornithological Society.

The second half of the storytelling session, by Huffington Post books editor Andrew Losowsky. *CLAP* (You had to be there.)

Our final speaker, Catherine Hubbard, Botanical Garden Manager at the Albuquerque BioPark.

Many thanks once again to our wonderful speakers, our sponsors, the Longwood guest services team, and too many others to mention in one place who helped out behind the scenes in different ways. And finally, thanks to all the Symposium attendees, who came out to learn and engage with us and with one another on the issue of conservation messaging at our institutions. We hope the experience was worthwhile for all, and that you will be back for another exciting Symposium next year!

Introducing: the 2012 Longwood Graduate Symposium!

(written by Ashby Leavell)

The holidays are over, and some of you out there may be wondering what there is to look forward to as you settle in for the winter. Never fear, the 2012 Longwood Graduate Symposium is almost here! Mark your calendars for Friday, March, 2nd when we will be excited to present “The Panda and the Public Garden: Reimagining our Conservation Story.” Join us at Longwood Gardens as we bring zoo and garden experts together to explore how public gardens can inspire audiences to advocate for conservation issues.

Our Speakers Committee worked up until the last minute before the holiday break to put the finishing touches on the schedule of the day and the presenter lineup.  Many thanks to Fellows James Hearsum, Aubree Pack, Abby Johnson, and Martin Smit for organizing an outstanding group of speakers. We are excited to bring you:

Jerry Borin of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, Dr. Alistair Griffiths from the Eden Project,  John Gwynne of the Bronx Zoo and the Wildlife Conservation Society, Catherine Hubbard of the Albuquerque BioPark, and Kathy Wagner of the Philadelphia Zoo. Stay tuned for an upcoming blog post introducing these compelling speakers, as well as details regarding a special session on better storytelling with Sally O’Byrne of the Delaware Nature Society and Andrew Losowsky of the Huffington Post.

The Marketing Committee Fellows Felicia Yu, Sara Levin, and Won Soon Park graciously put in overtime this holiday to finalize the Symposium brand, website, and brochure.  Check out our website to register and to learn more about the speakers and schedule of the day: http://ag.udel.edu/longwoodgrad/symposium/2012/index.html

Working with staff at Longwood Gardens, Guest Relations Committee Fellows Quill Teal- Sullivan and Nate Tschaenn have organized an exceptional attendee experience for our guests on March 2nd. We know you’ll be pleased with their careful attention to detail when the big day arrives. Our Symposium is made possible through the generous support of our sponsors. This year, we have reached out to an enthusiastic network of local gardens, horticultural sponsors, and professional organizations. We have seen tremendous support through both monetary and in-kind donations.  Bravo to Sponsorship chair Raakel Toppila for spearheading these efforts.

Check back here and on our Symposium website to follow our progress and learn more about the event. If you have any questions, please contact us at longwoodsymposium@udel.edu.