The Regal Victoria

Photography: Longwood Graduate Fellows

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The familiar knocking wake-up call came at 5:45am this morning and once again we put on clothes, life-jackets, sunglasses, shoes and promptly hopped in the canoes. This morning we were only going a short distance over to the shore, where we disembarked and got onto an elevated walk way to journey through the rainforest canopy. It was wonderful to be able to get a new perspective of the rainforest, without having to get into a tree-climbing harness. It was the destination, however, that we were most excited about; we were on our way to see Victoria amazonica growing in the wild. As we emerged out of the forest, the walkway continued into the water where we were able to see many plants below us, including blooming Amazon Water-platters. It was truly amazing to see these majestic plants growing in the wild. The experience was only improved by a surprise visit by a group of capuchin monkeys!

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After all the excitement of our early morning adventure we returned to the boat for breakfast and then with reluctant hearts we began to collect our belongings, and repack our bags. Our last stop on the boat was at the meeting of the rivers. This is where the Rio Negro, the river we have been traveling on, and the Amazon River merge. The water continues on for thousands of meteres more to the Atlantic Ocean. The dark waters of the Rio Negro and the silty rivers of the Amazon river meet just East of Manaus, yet the water takes another 6km, creating a very unique natural phenomenon.

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From here the boat continued to the Manaus bay, where we disembarked and returned to the hotel to await transportation to the airport. It was sad to leave the amazon and our wonderful boat, but we were very excited to see what Belo Horizonte had in store for us.

 

If you want to learn more about Victoria amazonica and its importance at Longwood Gardens, check out Laurie’s blog post here.

About Joshua Darfler

Joshua grew up in rural New York spending much of his time outside in gardens, parks, and natural environments. While at Binghamton University he received his major in Cellular Molecular Biology and a minor in Environmental Studies. Even though his classes required a lot of time inside a lab, he took every opportunity to be outside working with plants. Every summer he would return to his hometown to work at a native plant nursery or help on small-scale organic farms in the region. During his senior year he helped start a community support agriculture program focused on students at his university and also started a student volunteer program to help clean up and improve local parks and green spaces. After graduating in 2011, Joshua accepted the propagation internship position at the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania. Here Josh truly cultivated his love for plants, greenhouses, and public gardens, thus driving him to pursue and accept a position in the Longwood Graduate Program.
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