Posts Tagged ‘19:1’

WCU Volume 19, Issue 1 – March 11, 2011

Friday, March 11th, 2011

PDF Version of WCU 19:1 – March 11, 2011

In this issue:

From the Editor: A New WCU Subscription Option for 2011

Vegetables
Biofumigant Mustards for Spring Vegetable Plantings
Fordhook Lima Bean Production
Producing and Sourcing Quality Transplants
Pea Herbicides

Agronomic Crops
Update on Avipel Section 18 for Bird Management in Field Corn
Will Your Crop Suffer from Sulfur Deficiency this Cropping Year?
Is it Time to Revisit Splitting Spring N Application on Winter Wheat?
Small Grain Weed Control
Time for Frost Crack Seeding of Small-Seeded Legumes
The Word is Out: Roundup Ready® Alfalfa Gains Approval for Spring Planting
Evaluating Alfalfa Stands in the Spring
Grain Marketing Highlights

General
Insecticide Update: Endigo ZC
Spring Cover Crop Management
Herbicide Rotation Restrictions

Announcements
New Castle Field Crops Meeting – March 17
Lima Bean Update/Breakfast – March 18
Produce Food Safety Training for Small Scale Growers
New Castle Soil Health and Vegetable Production Workshop – March 26
Sussex Soil Health and Vegetable Production Workshop – April 7

Weather

New Castle Soil Health and Vegetable Production Workshop

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Saturday, March 26, 2011     9:00 am – 12 noon
College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Farm (meet at Fisher Greenhouse)

Commercial vegetable growers, market gardeners, crop advisors, and others interested are invited to attend a workshop dedicated to soil health and vegetable crops. With tight rotations, land limitations, and intensive cultivation, soil health is a major concern with vegetable production.

This workshop will focus on incorporating soil health principles into vegetable production as part of an integrated crop and pest management program. Participants will spend most of the workshop doing hands-on soil quality and soil health evaluations in the field (visual, chemical, physical, and biological). We will also discuss best rotations for vegetables, using soil improving cover crops and green manures, using composts and organic amendments, and biofumigant crops in vegetable rotations.

Each participant will be encouraged to develop a soil health maintenance or improvement plan for their vegetable production.

Dr. Gordon Johnson, UD Extension Fruit and Vegetable Specialist, will be conducting this workshop.

To register, if you need additional information, or if you require special needs assistance for this meeting, please contact Carrie Murphy, Horticulture Agent, cjmurphy@udel.edu, or (302) 831-2506.

Sussex Soil Health and Vegetable Production Workshop

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Thursday, April 7, 2011     4:00 – 7:00 pm
University of Delaware
Carvel Research and Education Center Farm
(meet at Picnic Grove)

Commercial vegetable growers, market gardeners, crop advisors, and others interested are invited to attend a workshop dedicated to soil health and vegetable crops. With tight rotations, land limitations, and intensive cultivation, soil health is a major concern with vegetable production.

This workshop will focus on incorporating soil health principles into vegetable production as part of an integrated crop and pest management program. Participants will spend most of the workshop doing hands-on soil quality and soil health evaluations in the field (visual, chemical, physical, and biological). We will also discuss best rotations for vegetables, using soil improving cover crops and green manures, using composts and organic amendments, and biofumigant crops in vegetable rotations.

Each participant will be encouraged to develop a soil health maintenance or improvement plan for their vegetable production.

Dr. Gordon Johnson, UD Extension Fruit and Vegetable Specialist, will be conducting this workshop.

To register, contact Karen Adams at (302) 856-7303 or email adams@udel.edu. If you need additional information, or if you require special needs assistance for this meeting, please contact Cory Whaley, Agriculture Agent, whaley@udel.edu, or (302) 856-7303.

Produce Food Safety Training Sessions for Small Scale Growers: Good agricultural Practices and Good Handling Practices

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Small scale growers who did not attend voluntary produce food safety (GAP/GHP) training sessions in 2009 or 2010 are encouraged to do so in 2011.  This training program is offered by the University of Delaware Cooperative Extension, and the training certificate is issued by the Delaware Department of Agriculture.  Trainings are also sponsored by the Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association of Delaware.

Smaller growers that do not market wholesale are encouraged to become trained and learn about best ways to keep produce safe from food-borne pathogens.

Please Note: Training sessions for wholesale growers were held in Kent and Sussex counties in early March.

KENT COUNTY – Kent County Extension Office, Dover (UD Paradee Building), 69 Transportation Circle, Dover, DE 19901.  Call (302) 730-4000 to register.  Contact Phillip Sylvester for more information.

Small growers (limited or no wholesale) – 3 hour training, April 4, 2011, 6-9 pm.

SUSSEX COUNTY – University of Delaware, Carvel Research and Education Center, 16483 County Seat Highway, Georgetown, DE 19947.  Call (302) 856-7303 to register.  Contact Tracy Wootten or Cory Whaley for more information.

Small Growers (limited or no wholesale) – 3 hour training, April 14, 2011, 6-9 pm.

NEW CASTLE COUNTY – New Castle County Extension Office, 461 Wyoming Road
Newark, DE , 19716, Phone (302) 831-2506 to register.  Contact Maria Pippidis for more information.

Small Growers (limited or no wholesale) – 3 hour training, April 26, 2011, 6-9 pm.

New Castle County Field Crops Meeting

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Thursday, March 17, 2011     5:30-9:00 p.m.
Blackbird Community Center
Blackbird, DE

5:30 p.m.
Registration, Sign-in

6:00 to 6:20
Executive Market Update
Carl German

6:20 to 6:50
Field Corn and Soybean Insect Update for 2011 Joanne Whalen

6:50 to 7:00
Questions and 7th Inning Stretch

7:00 to 7:15
Planting Dates: How Important are They
Bob Uniatowski

7:15 to 7:40
Why Early-Season Weed Control is Important
Mark VanGessel

7:40 to 7:50 Snack Break

7:50 to 8:30
Soil Fertility Management: Environment versus Production, Greg Binford

8:30 to 9:00
Field Crop Disease Issues/Update
Bob Mulrooney

9:00 Questions, Conversation, and Adjournment

Have a safe trip home!

Lima Bean Update – Breakfast Meeting

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Friday, March 18, 2011     7:30-9:00 a.m.
Harrington Fire Hall
20 Clark Street, Harrington, DE 19952

Spartan Charge Herbicide Registration for Lima Bean – what we need to know about it

Other topics and discussions will include: brown marmorated stinkbug, Fordhook production, and other issues for upcoming lima bean season.

Breakfast provided.

Registration: Please call Karen Adams at (302) 856-2585 ext. 540 to register (no fee – only need registration for breakfast)

Mark VanGessel, Joanne Whalen, and Gordon Johnson

Herbicide Rotation Restrictions

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Mark VanGessel, Extension Weed Specialist; mjv@udel.edu

Herbicide rotational restrictions or guidelines are based on two criteria; regulatory and biological. Both of these criteria are equally important to the end user of the commodity and can be justification for rejecting the harvested product. Maximum residue levels are determined based on a range of tests and studies. Residue levels are determined to ensure that they are below a level that could cause an effect. Biological criteria are established to ensure the succeeding crops aren’t adversely impacted. It is critical that the pesticide label is read and understood before application. It does not matter whether the rotational restrictions were determined based on regulatory or biological criteria, the label needs to be followed. Rotational restrictions are often changed on the labels with little to no publicity, so review pesticide labels every year to be sure you are in compliance with the label.

Where we seem to have the biggest issue with rotational crops is with double cropped vegetables. Products used in sweet corn, peas, or other early-season crops can limit what can be planted after harvest.

Spring Cover Crop Managment

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Richard Taylor, Extension Agronomist; rtaylor@udel.edu

Although it seems like ancient history, many years ago when no-till technology was first beginning, Delaware and Maryland farmers were rapid adopters of cover crops for no-till grain production. Farmers mostly used cereal crops as winter cover crops. At the time, we learned some important lessons that we should remember this year because of the weather pattern that has occurred in a number of areas in Delaware.

Because there are a number of perceived environmental benefits with cover crops, government programs, as well as many environmentally-conscious growers have moved production agriculture back into heavy reliance on cover crops. Wheat and cereal rye are two popular cover crops, although some growers are using legumes, legume-cereal combinations, and even some other broadleaf crops such as the forage or Daikon radish. These cover crops are designed to protect the soil, add in organic residues, or supplement the soil with legume-derived nitrogen (N).

For any cover crop, whether it’s the grass cereals used for ground-covering, water-conserving mulch or legumes for spring N-fixation as well as for residue, I have found that there is a tendency to allow these crops to grow as much as possible by delaying herbicide or tillage or other cover crop control method as late as possible. In years when adequate rainfall occurs or good early season rainfall keeps the crop supplied, cover crops are not very harmful to soil moisture reserves or actually may be very helpful in drying out the surface soil. However, the season to be extra cautious in is the year when winter rainfall is below normal and this is followed by a dry early spring. The combination of lower than expected subsoil moisture level and rapid cover crop growth with heavy water use by the cover crop can lead to excessively dry sub-soil conditions.

The latter weather pattern seems to be developing in many areas of Delaware since winter rainfall has been below normal or the ground has been frozen during precipitation events. Growers need to monitor their subsoil moisture levels closely this spring and be prepared to terminate their cover crops earlier than normal if the subsoil becomes too dry. Early termination of the cover crop will allow time for subsequent rainfall to percolate into the subsoil and for the killed mulch to protect the soil from excessive water loss through evapotranspiration.

Growers or their consultants can check the subsoil moisture level with either the standard soil testing probe or with one that has an extended handle to make deep probing physically easier. It still is much of a “feel method” that depends on the experience of the person testing the soil. As a general rule, if subsoil is formed into a ball by squeezing it together in one’s hand and then the hand is opened and the ball easily falls apart with the least touch and no hint of moisture is present on the hand after making the ball, then the soil is on the dry to very dry side. The cover crop should be killed before the subsoil drops to the very dry state.

Insecticide Update: Endigo ZC

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Endigo ZC (Syngenta Crop Protection) – The following crops/crop groupings have been added to the Endigo federal label: barley, brassica cole crops, cucurbit vegetables, fruiting vegetables, lettuce, pome fruit, stone fruits and a few others. Please check the following link for rates, restrictions and use precautions (http://www.cdms.net/LDat/ld7T4001.pdf). In addition, you should also check the Delaware Department of Agriculture’s website to be sure these materials are labeled in Delaware http://www.kellysolutions.com/de/pesticideindex.htm. To use a material it must have both a state and federal label.

Grain Marketing Highlights – March 11, 2011

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Carl German, Extension Crops Marketing Specialist; clgerman@udel.edu

Executive Summary: USDA’s March Supply and Demand Report
The day of the release of USDA’s March 10 Supply and Demand report trader attention was said to be turning to USDA’s Grain Stocks and Planting Intentions reports to be released on March 31 . The next monthly supply and demand report will be released on April 8 . Today, the day after the release of the report, trader attention is turning to the stock market in anticipation of a large drop due to the earthquake that hit Japan yesterday afternoon. The commodity markets are expected to follow the Dow.

Ending Stocks for U.S. corn and soybeans were unchanged from last month, with only minor adjustments made to the balance sheets. U.S. Corn ending stocks for the ‘10/’11 marketing year were unchanged at 675 million bushels. U.S. soybean ending stocks were unchanged at 140 million bushels. U.S. Wheat ending stocks were increased by 25 million bushels from last month due to a 25 million bushel decrease in the estimate for exports, now projected at 843 million bushels.

World corn ending stocks were increased slightly, from 122.51 MMT in February to 123.14 MMT.

World soybean ending stocks were placed at 58.33 MMT, as compared to 58.21 MMT last month. The estimate for Brazilian soybean production was increased 1.5 MMT, from 68.5 to 70.0 MMT. Argentina’s production was left unchanged at 49.5 MMT.

For world wheat, USDA increased ending stocks to 181.9 MMT from 177.77 MMT last month. Australian wheat production is now projected at 26.0 MMT, an increase of 1 MMT from a month ago. The estimate for Canadian wheat was left unchanged at 23.2 MMT.

U.S. ENDING STOCKS (billion bushels) 2010-2011

Mar. Average High Low Feb. 2009-10
Corn 0.675 0.667 0.702 0.625 0.675 1.708
Soybeans 0.140 0.141 0.181 0.121 0.140 0.151
Wheat 0.843 0.809 0.843 0.751 0.818 0.976
Sorghum 0.037 0.037 0.041 0.032 0.037 0.041

WORLD ENDING STOCKS (million metric tons) 2010-2011

Mar. Average High Low Feb. 2009-10
Corn 123.14 121.63 122.51 120.00 122.51 145.16
Soybeans 58.33 59.19 60.00 122.51 58.21 60.17
Wheat 181.90 177.57 179.20 175.20 177.77 197.60

WORLD PRODUCTION (Million Metric Tons)

2010-2011 2009-2010
Mar. Feb. Mar. Feb.
Brazil Corn 53.0 51.0 56.1 56.1
Argentina Corn 22.0 22.0 22.8 22.8
Brazil Soybeans 70.0 68.5 69.0 69.0
Argentina Soybeans 49.5 49.5 54.5 54.5
Australia Wheat 26.0 25.0 21.9 21.9
Canada Wheat 23.2 23.2 26.9 26.9

Market Strategy

As expected, commodity markets have opened lower this morning. The Dow, crude oil, and the dollar are also lower. We have entered an unfavorable period for commodity marketing. It is always tougher to make sales decisions in declining markets. Currently, corn, soybean, and SRW wheat are trading double digits lower with Dec ‘11 corn futures at $5.80; Nov ‘11 soybeans at $13.05; and July ‘11 SRW wheat at $7.53 per bushel. April ‘11 crude is trading at $102.70; the nearby U.S. dollar Index at 76.995; and the Dow is 11,945. Place sales decisions on hold unless needing to play catch-up.

For technical assistance on making grain marketing decisions contact Carl L. German, Extension Crops Marketing Specialist.