Posts Tagged ‘vegetable insect scouting’

Vegetable Crop Insects – June 22, 2012

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Lima Beans
We are starting to find the first spider mites in dry land fields. Dimethoate and bifenthrin are labeled for spider mite control in lima beans. Controls are only effective if treatments are applied before populations explode.

Melons
Continue to scout all melons for aphids, cucumber beetles, and spider mite. With the recent hot weather, we are finding an increase in spider mite activity. The threshold for mites is 20-30% infested crowns with 1-2 mites per leaf. Acramite, Agri-Mek, bifenthrin, Danitol, Oberon, Portal and Zeal are labeled on melons for mite control. Be sure to read all labels carefully for rates and restrictions since some are restricted to only one application as well as ground application only.

Peppers
As soon as the first flowers can be found, be sure to consider a corn borer treatment. Depending on local corn borer trap catches, sprays should be applied on a 7-10 day schedule once pepper fruit is ¼ – ½ inch in diameter. Be sure to check local moth catches in your area by calling the Crop Pest Hotline (instate: 800-345-7544; out of state: 302-831-8851) or visiting our website at: http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html. You will also need to consider a treatment for pepper maggot. Since beet armyworm moths have already migrated to our area, be sure to watch for small beet armyworm since larvae can quickly cause defoliation.

Potatoes
Continue to scout fields for Colorado potato beetle and leafhoppers. We have seen an increase in leafhopper populations and low levels of aphids have also been found. Controls will be needed for green peach aphids if you find 2 aphids per leaf during bloom and 4 aphids per leaf post bloom. This threshold increases to 10 per leaf at 2 weeks from vine death/kill. If melon aphids are found, the threshold should be reduced by ½.

Snap Beans
Continue to sample all seedling stage fields for leafhopper and thrips activity. We have seen an increase in leafhopper activity this past week. As a general guideline, once corn borer catches reach 2 per night, fresh market and processing snap beans in the bud to pin stages should be sprayed for corn borer. Sprays will be needed at the bud and pin stages on processing beans. Additional sprays may be needed after the pin spray on processing beans. Since trap catches can change quickly, be sure to check our website for the most recent trap catches and information on how to use this information to make a treatment decision in processing snap beans after bloom (http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html and http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/thresh/snapbeanecbthresh.html). Once pins are present on fresh market snap beans and corn borer trap catches are above 2 per night, a 7 to 10-day schedule should be maintained for corn borer control.

Sweet Corn
Continue to sample all fields from the whorl through pre-tassel stage for corn borers, fall armyworm and corn earworm. A treatment should be applied if 12 to 15% of the plants are infested with larvae. Since fall armyworm feeds deep in the whorls, sprays should be directed into the whorls and multiple applications are often needed to achieve control. The first silk sprays will be needed for corn earworm as soon as ear shanks are visible. Be sure to check both blacklight and pheromone trap catches since the spray schedules can quickly change. Trap catches are generally updated on Tuesday and Friday mornings (http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html and http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/thresh/silkspraythresh.html). You can also call the Crop Pest Hotline (in state: 1-800-345-7544; out of state: 302-831-8851).

Vegetable Crop Insects – June 15, 2012

Friday, June 15th, 2012

Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Melons
Continue to scout all melons for aphids, cucumber beetles, and spider mites. The threshold for mites is 20-30% infested crowns with 1-2 mites per leaf. Acramite, Agri-Mek, bifenthrin, Danitol, Oberon, Portal and Zeal are labeled on melons for mite control. Be sure to read all labels carefully for rates and restrictions since some are restricted to only one application as well as ground application only.

Peppers
As soon as the first flowers can be found, be sure to consider a corn borer treatment. Depending on local corn borer trap catches, sprays should be applied on a 7-10 day schedule once pepper fruit is ¼ – ½ inch in diameter. Be sure to check local moth catches in your area by calling the Crop Pest Hotline (instate: 800-345-7544; out of state: 302-831-8851) or visiting our website at (http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html). You will also need to consider a treatment for pepper maggot as soon as small fruit are present.

Snap Beans
Continue to sample all seedling stage fields for leafhopper and thrips activity. As a general guideline, once corn borer catches reach 2 per night, fresh market and processing snap beans in the bud to pin stages should be sprayed for corn borer. Sprays will be needed at the bud and pin stages on processing beans. Additional sprays may be needed after the pin spray on processing beans. Since trap catches can change quickly, be sure to check our website for the most recent trap catches and information on how to use this information to make a treatment decision in processing snap beans after bloom (http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html and http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/thresh/snapbeanecbthresh.html). Once pins are present on fresh market snap beans and corn borer trap catches are above 2 per night, a 7-10 day schedule should be maintained for corn borer control.

Sweet Corn
Continue to sample all fields from the whorl through pre-tassel stage for corn borers and corn earworms. Both species can be found feeding in whorls and tassels of sweet corn. A treatment should be applied if 15% of the plants are infested with larvae. The first silk sprays will be needed for corn earworm as soon as ear shanks are visible. Be sure to check both blacklight and pheromone trap catches since the spray schedules can quickly change. Trap catches are generally updated on Tuesday and Friday mornings (http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html and http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/thresh/silkspraythresh.html). You can also call the Crop Pest Hotline (in state: 800-345-7544; out of state: 302-831-8851). You will also need to scout for fall armyworm larvae in whorl stage sweet corn. A treatment should be considered when 12-15% of the plants are infested. Since fall armyworm feeds deep in the whorls, sprays should be directed into the whorls and multiple applications are often needed to achieve control.

Vegetable Crop Insects – June 8 2012

Friday, June 8th, 2012

Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Cucumbers
Cucumber beetles continue to be active so be sure to scout for beetles as well as aphids. Fresh market cucumbers are susceptible to bacterial wilt, so treatments should be applied before beetles feed extensively on cotyledons and the first true leaves. Although pickling cucumbers have a tolerance to wilt, a treatment may still be needed for machine-harvested pickling cucumbers when 5% of plants are infested with beetles and/or plants are showing fresh feeding injury. A treatment should be applied for aphids if 10 to 20 percent of the plants are infested with aphids with 5 or more aphids per leaf.

Melons
Continue to scout all melons for aphids, cucumber beetles, and spider mites. Although aphid populations are still relatively low, populations can quickly explode. The treatment threshold for aphids is 20% infested plants with at least 5 aphids per leaf. We continue to find fields with spider mites at economic levels. The threshold for mites is 20-30% infested crowns with 1-2 mites per leaf. Cucumber beetles continue to be an economic problem as well. Since beetles can continue to re-infest fields as well as hide under the plastic, be sure to check carefully for beetles as well as their feeding damage. Multiple applications are often needed to achieve effective control. When fields are blooming, it is important to consider pollinators when making an insecticide application: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/pdf/pnw/pnw591.pdf.

Peppers
As soon as the first flowers can be found, be sure to consider a corn borer treatment. Depending on local corn borer trap catches, sprays should be applied on a 7-10 day schedule once pepper fruit is ¼ – ½ inch in diameter. Be sure to check local moth catches in your area by calling the Crop Pest Hotline (instate – 800-345-7544; out of state- 302-831-8851) or visiting our website at http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html.

Potatoes
Continue to scout fields for Colorado potato beetle (CPB), corn borers (ECB) and leafhoppers. Adult CPB as well as the small and large larvae can now be found. A treatment should be considered for adults when you find 25 beetles per 50 plants and defoliation has reached the 10% level. Once larvae are detected, the threshold is 4 small larvae per plant or 1.5 large larvae per plant. As a general guideline, controls should be applied for leafhoppers if you find ½ to 1 adult per sweep and/or one nymph per every 10 leaves.

Snap Beans
Continue to sample all seedling stage fields for leafhopper and thrips activity. The thrips threshold is 5-6 per leaflet and the leafhopper threshold is 5 per sweep. If both insects are present, the threshold for each should be reduced by 1/3. As a general guideline, once corn borer catches reach 2 per night, fresh market and processing snap beans in the bud to pin stages should be sprayed for corn borer. Sprays will be needed at the bud and pin stages on processing beans. After the pin spray on processing beans, the spray schedule will be determined by a combination of both moth catches and field scouting: http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html and http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/thresh/snapbeanecbthresh.html.

Once pins are present on fresh market snap beans and corn borer trap catches are above 2 per night, a 7-10 day schedule should be maintained for corn borer control.

Sweet Corn
Continue to sample seedling stage fields for cutworms and flea beetles. You should also sample whorl through pre-tassel stage corn for corn borers and corn earworms. A treatment should be applied if 15% of the plants are infested with larvae. The first silk sprays will be needed for corn earworm as soon as ear shanks are visible. Be sure to check both black light and pheromone trap catches since the spray schedules can quickly change. Trap catches are generally updated on Tuesday and Friday mornings: http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html and http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/thresh/silkspraythresh.html. You can also call the Crop Pest Hotline for the most recent trap catches (in state: 1-800-345-7544; out of state: 302-831-8851).

Vegetable Crop Insects – June 1, 2012

Friday, June 1st, 2012

Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Cucumbers
As expected, cucumber beetle activity increased significantly this past week so be sure to scout for beetles as well as aphids. Fresh market cucumbers are susceptible to bacterial wilt, so treatments should be applied before beetles feed extensively on cotyledons and the first true leaves. Although pickling cucumbers have a tolerance to wilt, a treatment may still be needed for machine-harvested pickling cucumbers when 5% of plants are infested with beetles and/or plants are showing fresh feeding injury. A treatment should be applied for aphids if 10 to 20 percent of the plants are infested with aphids with 5 or more aphids per leaf.

Melons
Continue to scout all melons for aphids, cucumber beetles, and spider mites. We are finding fields with economic levels of cucumber beetles and spider mites. The threshold for mites is 20-30% infested crowns with 1-2 mites per leaf. Since beetles can continue to re-infest fields as well as hide under the plastic, be sure to check carefully for beetles as well as their feeding damage. Multiple applications are often needed to achieve effective control. Now that fields are blooming, it is important to consider pollinators when making an insecticide application (http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/pdf/pnw/pnw591.pdf).

Peppers
Continue to sample for corn borers and watch carefully for egg masses. Before fruit is present these young corn borer larvae can infest stems and petioles. As soon as the first flowers can be found, be sure to consider a corn borer treatment. Depending on local corn borer trap catches, sprays should be applied on a 7 to 10-day schedule once pepper fruit is ¼ – ½ inch in diameter. Be sure to check local moth catches in your area by calling the Crop Pest Hotline (instate: 800-345-7544; out of state: 302-831-8851) or visiting our website at http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html. You should also watch for an increase in aphid populations. A treatment may be needed prior to fruit set if you find 1-2 aphids per leaf for at least 2 consecutive weeks and beneficial activity is low.

Potatoes
Continue to scout fields for Colorado potato beetle (CPB), corn borers (ECB) and leafhoppers. Adult CPB as well as the small and large larvae can now be found. A treatment should be considered for adults when you find 25 beetles per 50 plants and defoliation has reached the 10% level. Once larvae are detected, the threshold is 4 small larvae per plant or 1.5 large larvae per plant. As a general guideline, controls should be applied for leafhoppers if you find ½ to one adult per sweep and/or one nymph per every 10 leaves.

Snap Beans
Continue to sample all seedling stage fields for leafhopper and thrips activity. The thrips threshold is 5-6 per leaflet and the leafhopper threshold is 5 per sweep. If both insects are present, the threshold for each should be reduced by 1/3. As a general guideline, once corn borer catches reach 2 per night, fresh market and processing snap beans in the bud to pin stages should be sprayed for corn borer. Sprays will be needed at the bud and pin stages on processing beans. Once pins are present on fresh market snap beans and corn borer trap catches are above 2 per night, a 7 to 10-day schedule should be maintained for corn borer control.
http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html
http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/thresh/snapbeanecbthresh.html

We recently learned that succulent beans will be removed from the acephate label – this applies to all labeled formulations. At this point, we have been told that existing stocks that include the green/succulent bean usage can be sold and/or distributed under the previously approved labeling until March 14, 2013, unless EPA imposes further restrictions. We will be sure to update you as we receive more information.

Sweet Corn
Continue to sample seedling stage fields for cutworms and flea beetles. You should also sample whorl through pre-tassel stage corn for corn borers and corn earworms. A treatment should be applied if 15% of the plants are infested with larvae. We have also seen an increase in corn earworm catches, especially in pheromone traps, so be sure to watch carefully for small larvae being found in tassels. The first silk sprays will be needed for corn earworm as soon as ear shanks are visible. Be sure to check both blacklight and pheromone trap catches since the spray schedules can quickly change. Trap catches are generally updated on Tuesday and Friday mornings (http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html and http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/thresh/silkspraythresh.html). You can also call the Crop Pest Hotline for the most recent trap catches (in state: 800-345-7544; out of state: 302-831-8851.)

Vegetable Crop Insects – May 25, 2012

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Cucumbers
Be sure to scout for cucumber beetles and aphids. Fresh market cucumbers are susceptible to bacterial wilt, so treatments should be applied before beetles feed extensively on cotyledons and first true leaves. Although pickling cucumbers have a tolerance to wilt, a treatment may still be needed for machine-harvested pickling cucumbers when 5% of plants are infested with beetles and/or plants are showing fresh feeding injury. A treatment should be applied for aphids if 10 to 20 percent of the plants are infested with aphids with 5 or more aphids per leaf.

Melons
Continue to scout all melons for aphids, cucumber beetles, and spider mites. The treatment threshold for aphids is 20% infested plants with at least 5 aphids per leaf. The first spider mites are being found in watermelons. The threshold for mites is 20-30% infested crowns with 1-2 mites per leaf. We have also seen an increase in cucumber beetle activity, especially in cantaloupe fields. Since beetles can continue to re-infest fields as well as hide under the plastic, be sure to scout carefully for beetles both under the plastic and on plants. With the predicted hot weather this weekend, we could see a rapid increase in populations.

Potatoes
Fields should be scouted for Colorado potato beetle (CPB), corn borers (ECB) and leafhoppers. Adult CPB as well as the first small larvae can now be found in fields not treated at planting. A treatment should be considered for adults when you find 25 beetles per 50 plants and defoliation has reached the 10% level. Once larvae are detected, the threshold is 4 small larvae per plant or 1.5 large larvae per plant. As a general guideline, controls should be applied for leafhoppers if you find 0.5 to 1 adult per sweep and/or one nymph per every 10 leaves.

Snap Beans
Continue to sample all seedling stage fields for leafhopper and thrips activity. The thrips threshold is 5-6 per leaflet and the leafhopper threshold is 5 per sweep. If both insects are present, the threshold for each should be reduced by 1/3. Once corn borer catches reach 2 per night, fresh market and processing snap beans in the bud to pin stages should be sprayed for corn borer. Sprays will be needed at the bud and pin stages on processing beans. Once pins are present on fresh market snap beans and corn borer trap catches are above 2 per night, a 7 to 10-day schedule should be maintained for corn borer control. (http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html).

Sweet Corn
We have received reports of an increase in wireworm damage, especially in fields where damage has occurred in past years. Although most, if not all seed is treated with one of the commercial applied neonicotinoid seed treatments, a soil insecticide may also be needed in fields with heavy population pressure. Once fields emerge, be sure to sample for cutworms and flea beetles. You should also sample all whorl stage corn for corn borers. A treatment should be applied if 15% of the plants are infested. The first silk sprays will be needed for corn earworm as soon as ear shanks are visible. Be sure to check trap catches since the spray schedules can quickly change. You can call the Crop Pest Hotline for the most recent trap catches (in state: 1-800-345-7544; out of state: 302-831-8851) or check our website at http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html.

Vegetable Crop Insects – May 18, 2012

Friday, May 18th, 2012

Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Melons
Continue to scout all melons for aphids, cucumber beetles, and spider mites. In many fields, lady beetle populations are high and have helped to keep aphid populations in check. We continue to find cucumber beetles, especially in cantaloupe fields. Populations can explode so be sure to scout carefully since damage can occur quickly. Since beetles can continue to re-infest fields as well as hide under the plastic, multiple applications are often needed to achieve control.

Peppers
Be sure to sample for thrips and corn borers. On young plants, corn borer larvae can bore into the stems and petioles. In areas where peppers are isolated or corn is growing slowly, moths are often attracted to young pepper plants. Therefore, you should watch for corn borer moths laying eggs in all fields. As a general guideline, treatment may be needed if there is no corn in the area or you are using rye strips as windbreaks. You should also look for egg masses on the leaves. For the most recent trap catches, you can check our website at http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html or call the Crop Pest Hotline (in state: 1-800-345-7544; out of state: 302-831-8851).

Snap Beans
Continue to sample all seedling stage fields for leafhopper and thrips activity. The thrips threshold is 5-6 per leaflet and the leafhopper threshold is 5 per sweep. If both insects are present, the threshold for each should be reduced by 1/3. In addition, be sure to watch for bean leaf beetle. Damage appears as circular holes in leaves and significant defoliation can quickly occur. As a general guideline, a treatment should be considered if defoliation exceeds 20% prebloom.

Sweet Corn
Continue to sample for cutworms and flea beetles. As a general guideline, treatments should be applied if you find 3% cut plants or 10% leaf feeding. In order to get an accurate estimate of flea beetle populations, fields should be scouted mid-day when beetles are active. A treatment will be needed if 5% of the plants are infested with beetles. On the earliest planted fields, be sure to watch for larvae feeding in the whorls. A treatment should be applied if 15% of the plants are infested. Corn earworms can also be found in light traps and pheromone traps. You can call the Crop Pest Hotline for the most recent trap catches (in state: 1-800-345-7544; out of state: 302-831-8851) or check our website at http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/latestblt.html.

Vegetable Crop Insects – May 11, 2012

Friday, May 11th, 2012

Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Leafminers in Vegetable Crops
Each spring, we receive reports of leaf miners attacking spring planted vegetable crops. There are a number of potential species that attack vegetables including the vegetable leafminer, serpentine leaf miner, spinach leafminer and beet leafminer. Leaf miners can be difficult to control and we have limited experience with control strategies in our area. The following links provide information on some of the potentially important species:
http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/veg/leaf/vegetable_leafminer.htm

http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/veg/leaf/a_serpentine_leafminer.htm

http://extension.umass.edu/vegetable/insects/leafminer-beet-and-spinach

Cabbage
Continue to scout for diamondback and imported cabbageworm larvae. Economic levels of diamondback larvae can be found. A treatment should be applied when 5% of the plants are infested and before larvae move to the hearts of the plants.

Melons
Continue to scout all melons for aphids, cucumber beetles, and spider mites. Economic levels of aphids can be found in some fields but beneficial insects (lady beetles and parasitized aphids) can also be found and they are starting to help manage populations. As a general guideline, a treatment should be applied for aphids when 20 percent of the plants are infested, with 5 aphids per leaf and before significant leaf curling occurs.

Potatoes
Continue to sample for Colorado potato beetle adults and egg laying. A treatment should be considered for adults when you find 25 beetles per 50 plants and defoliation has reached the 10% level. Once larvae are detected, the threshold is 4 small larvae per plant or 1.5 large larvae per plant. Corn borer moths are being found in BLTs throughout the state; however, flights are still low. A corn borer spray may be needed 3-5 days after an increase in trap catches or when we reach 700-degree days (base 50).

Snap Beans
All seedling stage fields should be scouted for leafhopper and thrips activity. The thrips threshold is 5-6 per leaflet and the leafhopper threshold is 5 per sweep. If both insects are present, the threshold for each should be reduced by 1/3. Be sure to also watch for bean leaf beetle feeding. Damage appears as circular holes in leaves and we have seen significant damage in recent years on the earliest planted fields. As a general guideline, a treatment should be considered if you defoliation exceeds 20% prebloom.

Sweet Corn
Continue to sample for cutworms and flea beetles. As a general guideline, treatments should be applied if you find 3% cut plants or 10% leaf feeding. In order to get an accurate estimate of flea beetle populations, fields should be scouted mid-day when beetles are active. A treatment will be needed if 5% of the plants are infested with beetles. Be sure to also watch for corn borer in the whorls of the earliest planted fields. A treatment should be applied if 15% of the plants are infested.

Black Light and Pheromone Trapping Program Has Begun

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Our black light and CEW pheromone traps are now up and running for the season. The traps are generally checked on Monday and Thursday and counts are posted by early Tuesday and Friday morning. True Armyworm moth catches will be posted only through the month of May. We will once again check traps for all stink bug species. Please use the following link to access all trap information: http://ag.udel.edu/extension/IPM/traps/index.html. I will also begin the Crop Pest Hotline mid-May (instate: 800-345-7544; out of state: 302- 831-8851).

Vegetable Crop Insects – May 4, 2012

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Melons
As soon as plants are set in the field, be sure to scout for aphids, cucumber beetles, and spider mites. The first cucumber beetles have been observed and with the predicted warmer weather for the end of week we could see an increase in activity. Since beetles can continue to re-infest fields as well as hide under the plastic, multiple applications are often needed to achieve control.

Potatoes
Low levels of the first emerged adults continue to be found in fields where an at planting insecticide was not used. A treatment should not be needed for adults until you find 25 beetles per 50 plants and defoliation has reached the 10% level.

Snap Beans
Be sure to sample all seedling stage fields for leafhopper and thrips activity. The thrips threshold is 5-6 per leaflet and the leafhopper threshold is 5 per sweep. If both insects are present, the threshold for each should be reduced by one third.

Sweet Corn
Be sure to scout emerged fields for cutworms and flea beetles. As a general guideline, treatments should be applied for cutworms if you find 3% cut plants or 10% leaf feeding. In order to get an accurate estimate of flea beetle populations, fields should be scouted mid-day when beetles are active. A treatment will be needed if 5% of the plants are infested with beetles. In fields that were planted under plastic, begin to scout for corn borers as soon as the plastic is removed.

Vegetable Crop Insects – April 27, 2012

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Asparagus
Asparagus beetles adults can still be found laying eggs and feeding on spears. As a general guideline, a treatment is recommended if 2% of the spears are infested with eggs. Since adults also feed on the spears, a treatment is recommended if 5% of the plants are infested with adults.

Cabbage
Continue to scout fields for imported cabbage worm and diamondback larvae. Larvae can be found and sprays will be needed before they move deep into the heads. As a general guideline, a treatment is recommended if you find 5% of the plants infested with larvae.

Melons
Watch for aphids in the earliest transplanted fields. In past years, we have been asked about ants being found near melon transplants. In many cases, if ants are present you should look carefully on the undersides of leaves for melon aphids. Ants are commonly found associated with melon aphids in fields. They are often present in fields to collect honeydew from the aphids and can even hinder predation by other insects. As a general guideline, a treatment should be applied for aphids when 20 percent of the plants are infested, with 5 aphids per leaf.

Peas
Continue to sample fields for aphids. On small plants, you should sample for aphids by counting the number of aphids on 10 plants in 10 locations throughout a field. On larger plants, take 10 sweeps in 10 locations. As a general guideline, a treatment is recommended if you find 5-10 aphids per plant or 50 or more aphids per sweep. When sampling dryland peas, you may want to reduce the threshold, especially if they are drought stressed. Be sure to check labels for application restrictions during bloom.

Potatoes
As soon as plants emerge, be sure to sample fields for Colorado potato beetle adults, especially if an at-planting material was not used. Low levels of the first emerged adults can now be found. A treatment should not be needed for adults until you find 25 beetles per 50 plants and defoliation has reached the 10% level

Sweet Corn
Be sure to scout emerged fields for cutworms and flea beetles. As a general guideline, treatments should be applied for cutworms if you find 3% cut plants or 10% leaf feeding. In order to get an accurate estimate of flea beetle populations, fields should be scouted mid-day when beetles are active. A treatment will be needed if 5% of the plants are infested with beetles.